Human Chemistry (Volume Two)

Front Cover
Lulu.com, Sep 1, 2007 - Science - 436 pages
2 Reviews
Volume two begins with Goethe's theories of affinities, i.e. the chemical reaction view of human life in 1809. This is followed by the history of how the thermodynamic (1876) and quantum (1905) revolutions modernized chemistry such that affinity (the 'force' of reaction) is now viewed as a function of thermodynamic 'free energy' (reaction spontaneity) and quantum 'valency' (bond stabilities). The composition, energetic state, dynamics, and evolution of the human chemical bond A?B is the centerpiece of this process. The human bond is what gives (yields) and takes (absorbs) energy in life. The coupling of this bond energy, driven by periodic inputs of solar photons, thus triggering activation energies and entropies, connected to the dynamical work of life, is what quantifies the human reaction process. This is followed by topics including mental crystallization, template theory, LGBT chemistry, chemical potential, Le Chatelier's principle, Mller dispersion forces, and human thermodynamics.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

good book

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

First textbook on the chemistry of human molecules. Volume two builds on the introductory concepts of volume one by digging into the chemistry of German polymath Johann Goethe’s 1809 Elective Affinities, in chapter 10, which is the core chapter of the entire two-volume textbook. This is followed by chapter 11, which explains how, in 1882 it was proved that the measure of chemical affinity, in a modern chemical thermodynamics sense, is free energy. Chapters 12-14 give an introduction to history of human bonding theories and an explanation of modern the theory of the human chemical bond. Chapter 15 introduces a few advanced topics and chapter 16 introduces human thermodynamics.  

Contents

I
371
II
423
III
469
IV
515
V
561
VI
609
VII
653
VIII
703
IX
761
X
795
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page i - I wish we could derive the rest of the phenomena of Nature by the same kind of reasoning from mechanical principles, for I am induced by many reasons to suspect that they may all depend upon certain forces by which the particles of bodies, by some causes hitherto unknown, are either mutually impelled towards one another, and cohere in regular figures, or are repelled and recede from one another.

Bibliographic information