The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy

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James Hankins
Cambridge University Press, Oct 25, 2007 - Philosophy
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The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy, published in 2007, provides an introduction to a complex period of change in the subject matter and practice of philosophy. The philosophy of the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries is often seen as transitional between the scholastic philosophy of the Middle Ages and modern philosophy, but the essays collected here, by a distinguished international team of contributors, call these assumptions into question, emphasizing both the continuity with scholastic philosophy and the role of Renaissance philosophy in the emergence of modernity. They explore the ways in which the science, religion and politics of the period reflect and are reflected in its philosophical life, and they emphasize the dynamism and pluralism of a period which saw both new perspectives and enduring contributions to the history of philosophy. This will be an invaluable guide for students of philosophy, intellectual historians, and all who are interested in Renaissance thought.
 

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The Cambridge companion to Renaissance philosophy

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This latest entry in a solid series that has treated both individual thinkers and epochs supports the publisher's reputation for providing scholarly overviews that are elucidating to graduate-level ... Read full review

The Cambridge companion to Renaissance philosophy

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

This latest entry in a solid series that has treated both individual thinkers and epochs supports the publisher's reputation for providing scholarly overviews that are elucidating to graduate-level ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
The philosopher and Renaissance culture
13
Humanism scholasticism and Renaissance philosophy
30
Continuity and change in the Aristotelian tradition
49
The revival of Platonic philosophy
72
The revival of Hellenistic philosophies
97
Arabic philosophy and Averroism
113
philosophical prescriptions
137
Philosophy and the crisis of religion
234
Hispanic scholastic philosophy
250
New visions of the cosmos
270
Organizations of knowledge
287
Humanistic and scholastic ethics
304
The problem of the prince
319
The significance of Renaissance philosophy
338
Brief biographies of Renaissance philosophers
346

Nicholas of Cusa and modern philosophy
173
Lorenzo Valla and the rise of humanist dialectic
193
The immortality of the soul
211
Bibliography
361
Index
401
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Page 1 - Here indeed lies the justest and most plausible objection against a considerable part of metaphysics, that they are not properly a science; but arise either from the fruitless efforts of human vanity, which would penetrate into subjects utterly inaccessible to the understanding, or from the craft of popular superstitions, which, being unable to defend themselves on fair ground, raise these entangling brambles to cover and protect their weakness.
Page 1 - They select the most striking observations and instances from common life, place opposite characters in a proper contrast, and, alluring us into the paths of virtue by the views of glory and happiness, direct our steps in these paths by the soundest precepts and most illustrious examples. They make us feel the difference between vice and virtue; they excite and regulate our sentiments ; and so they can but bend our hearts to the love of probity and true honour, they think that they have fully attained...
Page 2 - Accurate and just reasoning is the only catholic remedy, fitted for all persons and all dispositions ; and is alone able to subvert that abstruse philosophy and metaphysical jargon, which, being mixed up with popular superstition, renders it in a manner impenetrable to careless reasoners, and gives it the air of science and wisdom.
Page 1 - The fame of Cicero flourishes at present, but that of Aristotle is utterly decayed. La Bruyère passes the seas and still maintains his reputation, but the glory of Malebranche is confined to his own nation and to his own age.
Page 1 - The other species of philosophers consider man in the light of a reasonable rather than an active being, and endeavor to form his understanding more than cultivate his manners. They regard human nature as a subject of speculation, and with a narrow scrutiny examine it in order to find those principles which regulate our understanding, excite our sentiments, and make us approve or blame any particular object, action, or behavior.

About the author (2007)

James Hankins is Professor of History at Harvard University and editor of Renaissance Civic Humanism: Reappraisals and Reflections (2000, 2004).

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