The history of Christianity in India: from the commencement of the Christian era, Volume 5

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R.B. Seeley and W. Burnside, 1860 - Christianity
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Contents

Bishop proceeds to Madras
12
Consecration of St Georges Church
13
Bishop proceeds southward
14
CuddalorcChillumbrumTranquebarTanjoreTrichinopoly
15
16 Description of the converts 166
18
Bishops comparative view of Romanists and Protestants
19
PalamcottahArambooly Pass
21
QuilonCochinBombay
22
Christian Knowledge Societys Committee
23
Proceedings at Bombay
24
Interview with the Syrian Metran
28
AllepieColumbo
30
Progress of Christianity in Ceylon
32
Bishop preaches at Columbo
33
Bishop returns to Calcutta
34
Measures for the improvement of the church establishment
36
Impediments in the Bishops path
39
Indications of a favourable movement
40
Measures for native education
41
Project of a collegiate establishment
42
Royal Letter for the object
44
Grant from the Christian Knowledge Society
46
Second visit to Madras
49
The Christian Knowledge Societys Missions
52
Relief of the Tranquebar Mission
53
Foundation of St James Church and Schools Calcutta
54
Death of the Archdeacon of Madras and the Governor of Penang
55
Bishops standard of Missionary character
56
Evils of a superficial knowledge among the natives
57
English Liturgy in Cingalese and Tamnl
60
Improvement in the free school
61
Grant of land for the college
62
Plan and estimate of the building
63
Bishops preparatory discourse
64
Lays the foundationstone
66
Second visitation at Bombay
67
Bishop suffers from his exertions
68
Visit to Cochin
69
60 Conversion of a Romish Vicar Apostolic
70
Bishops interview with the Syrian Metran
71
Columbo now under the Bishops jurisdiction
75
Ordination of Mr Armour
77
Not authorised to ordain a native
78
European prejudices against East Indians
80
School of Industry at Point de Galle
81
Arrival of a principal and a professor
82
Account of Ram Mohun Roy
83
Grant from the Bible Society to the College
87
Third visitation at Calcutta
88
Encouraging aspect of the missionary field
89
Bishop urgent for missionary aid
90
English missionaries required
91
Church Missionary Societys annual grant of 1000 to the College
93
Bishops sickness and death
98
Good result from his exertion
102
Public testimony to his worth
105
CHRISTIANITY IN BOMBAY 18161820
107
Increase of chaplains
108
The effects of war
109
First schools for natives by the Education Society
110
Extension of territory and increase of military force Ill 7 First Scotch church built
113
Churches erected at various stations
114
Visitation of Bishop HeberGospel Propagation and Church Mis sionary Societies established
115
New schools of the Education Society built at Bycullah
116
The Native Education Society formed
117
Government support of regimental schoolsMilitary Asylum esta blished
118
Conclusion
119
CHAPTER III
121
Account of the mission property
124
Improvement in the schools and congregation
125
A new church erected
127
View of the mission in 1826
128
Revival at Cuddalorc under the Rev C Church
129
Declines again on his removal
130
Arrival of a missionary at Tanjorc
131
Death of M Pohle at Trichinopoly
133
Arrival of a successor
134
Christians at Coimhatoor
135
State of the Palamcottah mission in 1819
136
Printing the Tamul Liturgy 123
139
Measures for its improvement
140
Its progress in 1821
141
State of the Negapatam mission
143
Native education in Bengal
144
Native education at Bombay and Columbo
146
Transfer of the missions to Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts
147
CHAPTER
150
Arrival of missionaries at Calcutta
152
Operations extended in the schools
153
Generosity of a convert
154
New chapel at Calcutta and DumDum
155
Brahmins begin to oppose the Gospel
156
Accession and loss of several labourers
157
Effect of a devoted missionarys death
159
Success at Howrah
160
Fallacy of a Jesuits assertions respecting the progress of Christianity in India
161
New missionaries arrive their occupations
162
Summary of the progress at Calcntta
163
Success at Cutwa and Becrbhoom
164
Mr Chamberlain at Monghyr
168
Conversion and death of a Brahmin
169
Death of Mr Chamberlain
172
Remarkable conversions at Digah
173
The missionarys deathexertions of his widow
175
Arrival of another missionary
176
Schools at Agimere
177
Mission in Ceylon
179
Establishment of a college at Serampore
181
Commencement of the studies
184
Chartered by the King of Denmark
186
Establishment oi useful institutions
187
A Pastoral Letter to the congregations
188
Death of several members of the mission
189
Mr Wards preparation for death
190
Summary of his varied labours
191
Accession to the missionmeans of usefulness
192
State of the congregationa Christian village
193
Progress at Jessore
195
Character of Romanists
196
GoaCannanoreCochin 23
198
Chittagongmurder of the missionary
200
Death of his successor 2l
202
Station formed in Arracan
204
Malda relinquished
205
Awakening at Benares
207
Commencement at Futtyghur and Muttra
208
Excesses of superstition at Allahabad
209
The missionarys perseverance
212
Promising commencement at Delhi
213
Native professions to be received with caution 216
216
Number of labourers hitherto employed
217
Progress of translations of the Scriptures
218
Vindication of their character
220
CHAPTER V
223
Encouraging commencement of the mission
227
Missionaries dispersed
230
They arc reassembled
231
Two missionaries from America
232
Favourable impression on the natives
233
The first Burmese convert
234
The next two converts
235
Unfavourable change in the mission
236
Missionariesreception at the court of A va
237
Their return to Kangoon
239
Fidelity of the converts
240
Progress of the Gospel
241
Satisfactory character of the converts
242
Arrival of a missionary physician
243
Favourably received by the king
244
Mr Judson returns to Rangoon
245
Arrival of another missionary
247
Stato of the female converts
248
Mr and Mrs Judson proceed to Ava
249
Arrival of a British fleet at Rangoon
250
Sufferings of the missionaries and others at Ava
252
Their deliverance and return to Rangoon
262
Mrs Judsons death
264
Conclusion
265
Rev D Corries return
267
Baptizes a native convert
268
Appointed Archdeacon of Calcutta 26
270
Extension of education
271
Establishment at Mirzapore
274
Opening of the first schools
276
Their rapid increase
279
Need of teachers
281
Public examination of the schools
282
A central school established
284
The missionaries preaching
286
The mission press
287
Church Missionary Association and Auxiliary Society
289
Schools and church at Agra
290
His death
293
Chunar
295
A missionary joins the station
296
Mr Bowleys intercourse with the natives
297
His ordination increase of his flock
298
SchoolsTranslations
299
Church at Buxar
300
Opening at Titalya
302
Station suspended
303
Gorruckpore station
326
Cawnpore and other stations
327
CHAPTER VII
329
Progress of schools
333
Erection of the mission church Black Town
334
Arrival of more missionaries
337
Baptism of a Brahmin and other converts
338
Increase of schoolsSeminary established
341
S associations formed
345
PoonamalleeTrippasoor
346
Tranquebar
347
Chillambarum
349
Mr Schnarres death
350
John Devasagayam takes temporary charge of the station
351
Headquarters of the mission removed to Mayaverain
352
TinnevellySchools establishedAid from the Church Missionary Society
354
Rev J Houghs report as given by the SocietyA seminary opened
355
TAGE
359
Arrival of its first missionaries at Palamcottah
361
Progress of the seminary
362
Progress of the missionFemale education
364
Baptism of converts
367
Aspersions answered
371
Testimony of the S P C K
373
Mr Fenns tour through Travancore and Cochin
375
Mission work at Cotym
379
Scriptures translated into MalajralhnArrival of printing press 4c
382
Progress of translations
384
Account of the Syrian Church
385
College and schools at Cotym
387
Arrival of Rev J W Doran
389
Schools for the Syrians
390
Female school
391
Visits of Bishop Middleton and Rev W H Mill to the Syrians
393
Death of Mar Dionysius
395
Allepie
399
CochinLabours among the Jews
404
Success of Mr Ridsdales exertions
405
Nellore
406
Tellicherry
408
Coimbatoor
410
ChittoorRev H Harper commences a mission work
411
CHAPTER VIII
417
Schools opened
418
Translation of the Litnrgy
419
Church Missionary Association formed
420
Arrival of three missionaries 307
421
Kandy
422
Government grant of landmission buildings erected
424
Protestant burialground opened
425
Missionary encouragements
426
CottaGrant of groundschools built
427
Printing department
429
BaddagmeCharacter of the inhabitants
430
Schools built
431
Missionaries course of ministry
432
Grant of landChurch missionhouses and schools built
435
Missionaries healths failArrival of Mr Trimnell
437
NelloreSchools opened
438
Effects of the ravages of cholera
439
A seminary commenced
440
Church and mission buildings erected on ground granted by Govern ment
441
CHAPTER X
444
A seminary opened
445
New Testament and Liturgy printed
447
NegomboSchools established
448
KornegalleLand from Government for mission premises
449
CalturaPoint de GallcMatura
450
SchoolsMinistry
451
BatticaloaTrincomalee
453
JaffnaService held by a Portuguese lady
454
Point Pedro
455
CHAPTER XL
457
Negapatam
458
Bangalore
459
BombayA mission commenced
460
CHAPTER XII
462
A chapel built
463
Conversion of a Mahomedan
465
Schools prospercontinued on Sunday
466
Female and boarding schools begun
468
The press employed by the Christian Knowledge and other Societies
469
Mahratta translation of the Scriptures
470
Death of Gordon Hall founder of the mission
471
CHAPTER XIII
473
The stations increased to six around Jaifnapatam
475
Male female and boarding schools
477
CHAPTER XIV
483
Tally Gunge given up to the S P C K
484
Chapels built at Dhurrumtollah and other stations
485
Schools for the young and adults
486
Printing press
487
Chinsurah restored to the Dutch but schools continue to be sup ported by the British Government
489
Mission commenced at Benares
491
Improvement in the schools 307
492
MadrasAccount of the first native convert
496
Report of the mission
502
VizagapatamTeloogoo translation of the Scriptures
503
South TravancoreNagracoil
506
Mission at Combaconum
510
SchoolsA seminary
512
Union with the Church missionaries in forming a tract association
514
Quilon
516
Translation of the Scriptures into Canarese
518
BangaloreExertions of Major Mackworth
520
14 Converts from among Romanists and natives
521
Belgaum The missionary employed as chaplain by Government
523
Baptism of Brahmins
524
Benefits of the missionarys tour and labours
525
CuddapahMission station commencedVarious translations into Teloogoo
526
CHAPTER XVI
529
At length succeed in establishing schools
530
Translation of the Scriptures and other books into Giizerattco
531
CHAPTER XVII
533
Arrival of four more missionaries
534
Female schools 309
535
Scriptures in Mahratta supplied by the Bible and Christian Know ledge Societies associations
536
CHAPTER XVIII
537
Arrival in India
538
Examines the state of education
539
Bishops College
540
Liccses Church missionaries
542
ConfirmationVisitation of the clergy
544
Embarks for the Upper Provinces
545
Death of his chaplain
547
Destitute state of religion
548
Church and school at Benares
551
Mission at Chunar
553
AllahabadProceeds by landCawnpfire
555
Kingdom of Oude
556
Enters the Upper Provinces
557
Himalaya mountains
558
MeerutDelhiAgra
560
Central India
563
BarodaKairahBroachSurat
564
Arrival and exertions at Bombay
565
Visitation of Ceylon
569
Return to Calcutta
576
Embarks for Madras
578
Opening of a church and three chapels 309
580
MayaveramCombaconum
582
The Bishops death
583
Public demonstrations of sorrow 687
589
Estimate of Hebers character
590
CHAPTER XIX
593
Appointment of Rev J T JamesHis consecrationLands at Cape of Good Hope
594
Divides Calcutta into church districts
598
Deplores the exclusion of the Bible from the colleges in Calcutta
599
VisitationAddresses the missionaries in his charge
600
Ordination
602
His health begins to suffer
603
Commences his visitation north but obliged to return
604
Resigns his bishopricSails for PenangDies on the voyage
606
Testimonies borne to his life and character
607
CHAPTER XX
609
Interviews with Missionary Societies
610
Holds a confirmation at the Cape and establishes a Sunday school
612
Proceeds to CalcuttaMeeting of the S P C K Visitation
614
Archdeacon and Mrs Corrie become residents at the palace
615
The Bishops estimation of his characterVarious societies estab lished in Calcutta
616
Three churches builtBishop promotes the observance of the Lords day
617
Proposes measures for the benefit of India
620
Zealous for an efficient ecclesiastical establishment
622
Proposes the extension of the benefits of Bishops College
623
OrdinationA central school established at Howrah
624
Support of the Church Missionary Society
625
Calcutta High School established
627
Infant School established and maintained by the BishopErection of a new chapel at tho Free School
629
Visits the Hindoo collegeThe Archdeacon shews the evil effects of education without religion
630
District charitable society formed
633
Visitation southMadras confirmations
634
Also the C M S establishmentOrdains two of its catcchists
635
Bishop visits Tripassoor Bangalore SeringapatamThe Neil gherries
636
BombayCeylonCottaKandyBaddagame
637
Testimony to the work of the C M S
641
Bishops declining healthHis view of the state of religion generally
642
His illnessDeath
644
His character drawn by Archdeacon Corrie
645
Effect in England of the news of his death
647
Concluding remarks
649
APPENDIX
653

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Page 167 - He feedeth on ashes : a deceived heart hath turned him aside, that he cannot deliver his soul, nor say, Is there not a lie in my right hand...
Page 187 - ... godliness hath promise of the life that now is," as well as of that which is to come.
Page 33 - For Zion's sake will I not hold my peace, and for Jerusalem's sake I will not rest, until the righteousness thereof go forth as brightness, and the salvation thereof as a torch that burneth. And the nations shall see thy righteousness, and all kings thy glory : and thou shalt be called by a new name, which the mouth of the Lord shall name.
Page 257 - America, and my beloved friends there — but for nearly a year and a half, so entirely engrossed was every thought, with present scenes and sufferings, that I seldom reflected on a single occurrence of my former life, or recollected that I had a friend in existence out of Ava.
Page 256 - The officers who had taken possession of our property presented it to his majesty, saying, " Judson is a true teacher ; we found nothing in his house but what belongs to priests. In addition to this money, there are an immense number of books, medicines, trunks of wearing apparel, &c., of which we have only taken a list. Shall we take them, or let them remain ? "
Page 98 - Of him it may be truly said that, " when the ear heard him, then it blessed him ; and when the eye saw him, it gave witness to him. Because he delivered the poor that cried, and the fatherless, and him that had none to help him. The blessing of him that was ready to perish came upon him, and he caused the widow's heart to sing for joy.
Page 238 - Zah interpreted his royal master's will, in the following terms : — " Why do you ask for such permission ? Have not the Portuguese, the English, the Mussulmans, and people of all other religions, full liberty to...
Page 33 - But take heed lest by any means this liberty of yours become a stumbling-block to them that are weak.
Page 253 - Where is the teacher?' was the first inquiry. Mr. Judson presented himself. 'You are called by the King, ' said the officer — a form of speech always used when about to arrest a criminal. The spotted man instantly seized Mr. Judson, threw him on the floor, and produced the small cord, the instrument of torture. I caught hold of his arm. 'Stay,' said I, 'I will give you money.' 'Take her, too,
Page 224 - ... pillars, at the further end of which a curtain of black velvet, embossed with gold, conceals the august animal from the eyes of the vulgar, and before this curtain the offerings intended for him are displayed. His dwelling is a lofty hall covered with splendid gilding...

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