How to be Your Own Best Friend: A Conversation with Two Psychoanalysts

Front Cover
Ballantine Books, 1971 - Psychology - 96 pages
4 Reviews
"Sensible advice on how to give up childhood, accept yourself and your own maturity and deal with life on your own two feet."
DALLAS TIMES HERALD
In this unique, bestselling question-and- answer guide to self-love and acceptance, two practicing psychologists (who are also married to one another) reveal the secret of pursuing happiness, by revealing to ourselves what we think we are striving for, and what it is that keeps us from achieving our goals.
 

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Life-saving and changing!

User Review  - Baldwin - Borders

This may be the absolutely most important book that I have read (and I have read hundreds, maybe several thousand)--and you may read--in this lifetime. It is as clear and sobering as the clang of an ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - drakescott - LibraryThing

HTBYOBF features quickly-digested, easily-read wisdom from two married psychoanalysts in a familiar Q&A format, but is marred by some dated positions (e.g. homosexuality as a curable mental disorder ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
15
Section 2
16
Section 3
17
Section 4
19
Section 5
20
Section 6
22
Section 7
26
Section 8
28
Section 15
48
Section 16
52
Section 17
62
Section 18
66
Section 19
70
Section 20
72
Section 21
76
Section 22
80

Section 9
30
Section 10
32
Section 11
34
Section 12
40
Section 13
42
Section 14
46
Section 23
86
Section 24
88
Section 25
90
Section 26
93
Copyright

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About the author (1971)

Mildred Newman graduated from Hunter College High School and from Hunter College, where she received an M.A. in psychology. She spent a number of years in training with Theodore Reik, and she completed the analytic training program at the National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis. Newman was a supervisor for the Community Guidance Service of New York City, and her work has been anthologized in New Approaches in Child Guidance. She was married to Bernard Berkowitz until her death in 2001.
 
Bernard Berkowitz graduated from City College, received an M.S. from Columbia University, and his Ph.D. from New York University. He attended the Alfred Adler Institute and the Postgraduate Center for Mental Health. Dr. Berkowitz has been affiliated with City College and with the John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York, and has had numerous articles and reviews published in various journals. He lives in New York City.
 
Jean Owen graduated from Skidmore College and received an M.A. in philosophy from Columbia University. After collaborating with Newman and Berkowitz, she trained as a psychoanalyst and is currently practicing in New York City.

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