Bulletin, Issues 1-10

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1892
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Page 15 - Report of the Third Annual Meeting of the American Association of State Weather Services, Cooperating with the Weather Bureau, United States Department of Agriculture.
Page 39 - Kentucky from 185- to the present time; analyses by Dr. Robert Peter. For California, the several reports of the College of Agriculture and Experiment Station of the University of California, from 1877 to the present time. For Washington and Montana, the manuscript records of the Northern Transcontinental Survey, from 1880 to 1883. For Utah, New Mexico, and Colorado, manuscript record of work by HP Dyer, Chemist to the Utah Sugar Company, Lehi, UT For Wyoming, Bulletin Ko.
Page 24 - Now, in explanation of this, in great part at least, it is to be noted that the isotherms, or lines of equal temperature, for spring and fall extend west-northwest through the State, say parallel with a line running through Chattanooga and Trenton, or thereabout. This shows the southwestern corner to be the warmest, and here is our greatest center of cotton culture. The greater warmth stimulates the cotton, and by throwing back the killing frosts increases the length of the growing season. The soils...
Page 47 - In the analysis of silicates we employ caustic lime for the settingfree of the alkalies and the formation of easily decomposable silicates, by igniting the mixture ; but the carbonate will slowly produce a similar change, both in the laboratory and in the soils in which it is constantly present. This is strikingly seen when we contrast the analyses of calcareous clay soils of the humid region with the corresponding noncalcareous ones of the same. In the former the proportions of dissolved silica...
Page 38 - Geology defines the limits and areas of these different formations and of these different rocks, and as I have shown that these rocks determine the texture of the soil, a thorough and detailed geological map of the state should answer for a soil map. Any one familiar with the texture of the soil, or kind of soil, formed by the disintegration of granite, gabbro, and the different kinds of limestones, sandstones, and shales, should be able to tell by a glance at the map the position and area of each...
Page 22 - ... those of the temperate and frigid zones. While this fact has not been actually verified by the direct comparative chemical examination of corresponding soils from the several regions, owing to the want of uniformity in methods and the fewness of such investigations in tropical countries, yet the incomparable luxuriance of the natural as...
Page 44 - State in which the average (of seven analyses) is lower for magnesia than for lime. In the arid region, on the contrary, magnesia on the general average is nearly the same as lime; in the average by States, slightly above it; thus bringing the ratio for the two regions for magnesia up from one to six or seven. This also is so decisive a showing that no accident could bring it about; we must conclude that climatic influences have dealt with magnesia similarly as with lime; which from the standpoint...
Page 21 - These by-laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the association, by a majority vote of all members of the association.
Page 39 - ... no more evaporation into the air can occur, and consequently there is no longer any ascent of water; on the contrary, the water, by its own weight, penetrates the soil, and if the underlying ground be not saturated with moisture, as can happen where the subterranean fountains yield a meagre supply, then capillarity will aid gravity in its downward distribution. It is...
Page 26 - Madre, and the roughness of the hard granitic surfaces, contrasts sharply with the rounded ranges formed by the " rotten " granites of the Atlantic slope, where sound, unaltered rock can sometimes not be found at a less depth than forty feet; while at the foot of the Sierra Madre ridges, thick beds of sharp, fresh granitic sand, too open and pervious to serve as...

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