Complete Essays

Front Cover
Stanford University Press, 1965 - Literary Collections - 883 pages
This new translation of Montaigne's immortal Essays received great acclaim when it was first published in The Complete Works of Montaigne in the 1957 edition. The New York Times said, "It is a matter for rejoicing that we now have available a new translation that offers definite advantages over even the best of its predecessors," and The New Republic stated that this edition gives "a more adequate idea of Montaigne's manner, his straight and unpretentious style, than any of the half-dozen previous English translations."

In his Essays Montaigne warns us from the outset that he has set himself "no gal but a domestic and private one"; yet he is one author whose modernity and universality have been acclaimed by each age since he wrote. Probing into his emotions, attitudes, and behavior, Montaigne reveals to us much about ourselves.

As new editions of the Essays were published during his lifetime, Montaigne interpolated many new passages--often of considerable length. This volume indicates the strata of composition, so that the reader may follow the development of Montaigne's thought over the years. The detailed index provides a convenient means of locating the many famous passages that occur throughout the work.

 

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Contents

WITH APPROXIMATE DATES OF COMPOSITION
2
CHAPTER
13
when the true are wanting 157274
14
part on the opinion we have of them 157274
33
One is punished for defending a place obstinately without reason 157274
47
Of the punishment of cowardice 157274
48
A trait of certain ambassadors 157274
49
Of fear 157274
52
Defense
321
Conclusion
326
The objectors
327
Defense
328
Man is no better than the animals
330
Mans knowledge cannot make him happy
358
Mans knowledge cannot make him good
367
Man has no knowledge
370

That our happiness must not be judged until after our death 157274
54
That to philosophize is to learn to die 157274
56
Of the power of the imagination 157274
68
One mans profit is another mans harm 157280
76
Of custom and not easily changing an accepted law 157274
77
Various outcomes of the same plan 157280
90
Of pedantry 157278
97
Of the education of children 157980
106
It is folly to measure the true and false by our own capacity 157274
132
Of friendship 157276 157880
135
Twentynine sonnets of Etienne de La Boétie 157880
145
Of moderation 157280
146
Of cannibals 157880
150
We should meddle soberly with judging divine ordinances 157274
159
To flee from sensual pleasures at the price of life 157274
161
Fortune is often met in the path of reason 157274
163
Of a lack in our administrations 157274
165
Of the custom of wearing clothes 157274
166
Of Cato the Younger 157274
169
How we cry and laugh for the same thing 157274
172
Of solitude 157274
174
A consideration upon Cicero 157274
183
Of not communicating ones glory 157274
187
Of the inequality that is between us 157274
189
Of sumptuary laws 157274
196
Of sleep 157274
198
Of the battle of Dreux 157274
200
Of names 157274
201
Of the uncertainty of our judgment 157274
205
Of war horses 157274
209
Of ancient customs 157280
215
Of Democritus and Heraclitus 157280
219
Of the vanity of words 157280
221
Of the parsimony of the ancients 157280
224
Of vain subtleties 157280
225
Of smells 157280
228
Of prayers 157280
229
Of age 157280
236
BOOK II
239
Of drunkenness 157374
244
A custom of the island of Cea 157374
251
Let business wait till tomorrow 157374
262
Of conscience 157374
264
Of practice 157374
267
Of honorary awards 157880
275
CHAPTER 8 Of the affection of fathers for their children 157880
278
Of the arms of the Parthians 157880
293
Of books 157880
296
Of cruelty 157880
306
Apology for Raymond Sebond 157576 157880
318
Sebond and his book
319
Warning to the princess
418
Man can have no knowledge
420
The senses are inadequate
443
Changing man cannot know changing things
455
Man is nothing without God
457
Of judging of the death of others 157280
458
How our mind hinders itself 157576
463
Of glory 157880
468
Of presumption 157880
478
Of giving the lie 157880
503
Of freedom of conscience 157880
506
We taste nothing pure 157880
510
Against donothingness 157880
512
Of riding post 157880
515
Of evil means employed to a good end 157880
516
Of the greatness of Rome 157880
519
Not to counterfeit being sick 157880
521
Of thumbs 157880
522
Cowardice mother of cruelty 157880
523
All things have their season 157880
531
Of virtue 157880
532
Of a monstrous child 157880
538
Of anger 157880
539
Defense of Seneca and Plutarch 157880
545
The story of Spurina 157880
550
Observations on Julius Caesars methods of making war 157880
556
Of three good women 157880
563
Of the most outstanding men 157880
569
Of the resemblance of children to fathers 157980
574
BOOK III
599
Of repentance 158588
610
Of three kinds of association 158588
621
Of diversion 158588
630
On some verses of Virgil 158588
638
Of coaches 158588
685
Of the disadvantage of greatness 158588
699
Of the art of discussion 158588
703
Of vanity 158588
721
Of husbanding your will 158588
766
Of cripples 158588
784
Of physiognomy 158588
792
Of experience 158788
815
INDEX OF PROPER NAMES
859
458
864
462
865
463
868
506
869
516
870
519
873
521
874
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