The History of Mary Prince: A West Indian Slave

Front Cover
Penguin, May 25, 2000 - Biography & Autobiography - 114 pages
'I have been a slave - I have felt what a slave feels, and I know what a slave knows . . . '
Mary Prince recalls that in the slave market in Bermuda, where she was put up for sale, the buyers' talk 'fell like cayenne pepper into the fresh wounds of our hearts'. During her life as a slave she was taken from Bermuda to Turks Island and Antigua, eventually arriving in London where, in 1828, she reported the cruelty of her master and mistress to the Anti-Slavery Society. The History of Mary Prince (1831) was the first life of a black woman to be published in Britain. This extraordinary testament of ill-treatment and survival was a protest and a rallying-cry for emancipation that provoked two libel actions and ran into 3 editions in the year of its publication. This edition includes an introduction which discusses The History within the context of black writing, explanatory notes, a chronology, and supplementary material on enslavement and the case of Mary Prince.
 

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User Review  - zeborah - LibraryThing

One of those books that is what it says on the box. Hard to tell how much edited, though the editor claims as little as possible. Either way, Mary Prince tells her life vividly and economically ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
vi
INTRODUCTION
vii
FURTHER READING
xxxv
CHRONOLOGY
xxxix
A NOTE ON THE TEXT
xli
THE HISTORY OF MARY PRINCE
1
NOTES
71
APPENDIX ONE
89
APPENDIX TWO
99
APPENDIX THREE
100
APPENDIX FOUR
104
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Mary Prince (1788-1826) was born a slave in Bermuda. In 1815 she was sold to John Wood and taken to Antigua. Here she met Daniel James, a freeman, whom she married in 1826. In 1828, Prince was taken to England and claiming that the Woods had mistreated her she was allowed, under English law, to exercise her right to freedom and found employment as a domestic servant. Her story was published in 1831 and led to two libel trials.

Sara Salih is Assistant Professor in English at the University of Toronto. She is the author of Judith Butler (Routledge 2002), and the editor, with Judith Butler, of The Judith Butler Reader (Blackwell, 2004). She is currently working on a book about representations of brown women in England and Jamaica from the eighteenth century to the present day.

Sara Salih is lecturer in English at Wadham College, Oxford.

Sara Salih is Assistant Professor in English at the University of Toronto. She is the author of Judith Butler (Routledge 2002), and the editor, with Judith Butler, of The Judith Butler Reader (Blackwell, 2004). She is currently working on a book about representations of brown women in England and Jamaica from the eighteenth century to the present day.