Democracy in America, Volume 2

Front Cover
D. Appleton, 1904 - Democracy
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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - LisaMaria_C - LibraryThing

The book's basis was a nine month visit to America by De Tocqueville in 1831, ostensibly to study America's prison system. It was an interesting time to visit America, half-way between the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - carterchristian1 - LibraryThing

Years ago I took a readings class at Geoergia State University on Jacksonian democracy and this was our first assignment. It is amazing how fresh this book is. It makes you want to say out loud, as an America, "hey this is us, it is really US". Read full review

Contents

I
419
II
467
III
477
IV
484
V
502
VI
517
VII
539
VIII
580
X
608
XI
615
XII
639
XIII
650
XIV
664
XV
709
XVI
741
XVII
780

IX
593

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Page 591 - Americans of all ages, all conditions, and all dispositions constantly form associations. They have not only commercial and manufacturing companies, in which all take part, but associations of a thousand other kinds, religious, moral, serious, futile, general or restricted, enormous or diminutive.
Page 592 - Wherever at the head of some new undertaking you see the government in France, or a man of rank in England, in the United States you will be sure to find an association.
Page 806 - It covers the surface of society with a net-work of small complicated rules, minute and uniform, through which the most original minds and the most energetic characters cannot penetrate, to rise above the crowd. The will of man is not shattered, but softened, bent, and guided : men are seldom forced by it to act, but they are constantly restrained from acting : such a power does not destroy, but it prevents existence; it does not tyrannize, but it compresses, enervates, extinguishes, and stupifies...
Page 557 - Democratic nations care but little for what has been, but they are haunted by visions of what will be ; in this direction, their unbounded imagination grows and dilates beyond all measure.
Page 471 - America is a land of wonders, in which everything is in constant motion, and every change seems an improvement. The idea of novelty is there indissolubly connected with the idea of amelioration. No natural boundary seems to be set to the efforts of man ; and, in his eyes, what is not yet done is only what he has not yet attempted to do.
Page 582 - Individualism is a mature and calm feeling, which disposes each member of the community to sever himself from the mass of his fellows and to draw apart with his family and his friends, so that after he has thus formed a little circle of his own, he willingly leaves society at large to itself.
Page 483 - I allude to the Russians and the Americans. Both of them have grown up unnoticed; and while the attention of mankind was directed elsewhere, they have suddenly placed themselves in the front rank among the nations, and the world learned their existence and their greatness at almost the same time.
Page 806 - After having thus successively taken each member of the community in its powerful grasp, and fashioned them at will, the supreme power then extends its arm over the whole community. It covers the surface of society with a net-work of small complicated rules, minute and uniform, through which the most original minds and the most energetic characters cannot penetrate, to rise above the crowd.
Page 595 - As soon as several of the inhabitants of the United States have taken up an opinion or a feeling which they wish to promote in the world, they look out for mutual assistance; and as soon as they have found one another out, they combine. From that moment they are no longer isolated men, but a power seen from afar, whose actions serve for an example and whose language is listened to.
Page 594 - Feelings and opinions are recruited, the heart is enlarged, and the human mind is developed only by the reciprocal influence of men upon one another. I have shown that these influences are almost null in democratic countries; they must therefore be artificially created, and this can only be accomplished by associations.

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