The Innocence Of Father Brown

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Kessinger Publishing, Jun 1, 2004 - Fiction - 196 pages
16 Reviews
As Ivan explained to the guests, their host had telephoned that he was detained for ten minutes. He was, in truth, making some last arrangements about executions and such ugly things; and though these duties were rootedly repulsive to him, he always performed them with precision. Ruthless in the pursuit of criminals, he was very mild about their punishment.

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User Review  - justagirlwithabook - LibraryThing

It was really interesting to read a book published in 1911, when British Colonialism was still a thing and prejudiced thinking was much more rampant. I enjoyed the character of Father Brown. He is a ... Read full review

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User Review  - AJBraithwaite - LibraryThing

This book was a series of surprises for me, all stemming from my own ignorance. To begin with, I wasn't expecting it to be a series of short stories. I had also somehow assumed that G. K. Chesterton ... Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Gilbert Keith Chesterton was born in London, England, in 1874. He began his education at St Paul's School, and later went on to study art at the Slade School, and literature at University College in London. Chesterton wrote a great deal of poetry, as well as works of social and literary criticism. Among his most notable books are The Man Who Was Thursday, a metaphysical thriller, and The Everlasting Man, a history of humankind's spiritual progress. After Chesterton converted to Catholicism in 1922, he wrote mainly on religious topics. Chesterton is most known for creating the famous priest-detective character Father Brown, who first appeared in "The Innocence of Father Brown." Chesterton died in 1936 at the age of 62.

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