On Cosmopolitanism and Forgiveness

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Psychology Press, 2001 - Philosophy - 60 pages
This work is a discussion of one of the major issues in contemporary thinking by two of the world's leading thinkers. From the Stoics to Kant's idea of "perpetual peace", cosmopolitanism has been at the heart of philosophical and political thinking but until now has received little attention from contemporary commentators. Jacques Derrida asks how it is possible to uphold an international hospitality and sense of justice in the face of increasing nationalism and hostility to refugees. Richard Rorty asks whether the ideals of rights enshrined in liberty, equality and fraternity implicit in global cosmopolitanism are sustainable when the very concept of rights is problematic. What have duties and rights to do with hospitality? Should hospitality be grounded on a private or public ethic? Should we look to the city rather than the state for protection of basic freedoms?
 

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About the author (2001)

Jacques Derrida was born in El-Biar, Algeria on July 15, 1930. He graduated from the École Normal Supérieure in 1956. He taught philosophy and logic at both the University of Paris and the École Normal Supérieure for around 30 years. His works of philosophy and linguistics form the basis of the school of criticism known as deconstruction. This theory states that language is an inadequate method to give an unambiguous definition of a work, as the meaning of text can differ depending on reader, time, and context. During his lifetime, he wrote more than 40 books on various aspects of deconstruction including Of Grammatology, Glas, The Postcard: From Socrates to Freud and Beyond, and Ulysses Gramophone: Hear Say Yes in Joyce. He died of pancreatic cancer on October 9, 2004 at the age of 74.

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