Remarks on Article IX., in the Eighty-fourth Number of the North American Review: (July, 1834,) Entitled Origin and Character of the Old Parties...

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Perkins, Marvin, 1834 - Origin and character of the old parties... - 39 pages
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Page 31 - States," which does abridge the freedom of the press, is not law, but is altogether void and of no effect. IV. Resolved, that alien friends are under the jurisdiction and protection of the laws of the State wherein they are ; that no power over them has been delegated to the United States, nor prohibited to the individual States distinct from their power over citizens ; and it being true as a general principle, and one of the amendments to the Constitution having also declared that " the powers not...
Page 6 - But methinks he should stand in fear of fire, being burnt i' the hand for stealing of sheep. CADE Be brave, then; for your captain is brave, and vows reformation. There shall be in England seven halfpenny loaves sold for a penny: the three-hooped pot; shall have ten hoops and I will make it felony to drink small beer...
Page 6 - Be brave then ; for your captain is brave, and vows reformation. There shall be, in England, seven halfpenny loaves sold for a penny : the threehooped pot shall have ten hoops ; and I will make it felony to drink small beer: all the realm shall be in common, and in Cheapside shall my palfrey go to grass.
Page 16 - Whoever in any future age or unborn nation may admire the felicity of the expedient which converted the power of taxation into the shield of liberty, by which discretionary and secret imprisonment was rendered impracticable, and portions of the people were trained to exercise a larger share of judicial power than...
Page 16 - To have produced it, to have preserved it, to have matured it, constitute the immortal claim of England on the esteem of mankind. Her Bacons and Shakspeares, her Miltons and Newtons, with all the truth which they have revealed, and all the generous virtue which they have inspired, are of inferior value when compared with the subjection of men and their rulers...
Page 16 - ... under the eye of a wellinformed nation, discuss and determine the laws and policy likely to make communities great and happy ; — whoever is capable of comprehending all the effects of such institutions, with all their possible improvements upon the mind and genius of a people, is sacredly bound to speak with reverential gratitude of the authors of the great charter. To have produced it, to have preserved it, to have matured it, constitute the immortal claim of England on the esteem of mankind.
Page 35 - ... and those of their agents, to countenance and invigorate opposition ; their disregard of solemn treaties and the laws of nations ; their war upon our defenceless commerce ; their treatment of our ministers of peace...
Page 32 - His private opinion was, that they were '•good and proper.'< But, whatever might be their merits, it belonged to the people, who held the reins over the head of Congress, and to them alone, to say whether they were acceptable or otherwise, to Virginians ; and that this must be done by way of petition. That Congress were as much our representatives as the Assembly, and had as good a right to our confidence. He had seen, with regret, the unlimited power over...
Page 36 - Believe me, Sir, no one can more cordially approve of the wise and prudent measures of your Administration. They ought to inspire universal confidence, and will no doubt, combined with the state of things, call from Congress such laws and means as will enable you to meet the full force and extent of the Crisis.
Page 32 - Constitution; and in daring to pronounce upon the validity of Federal laws, had gone out of her jurisdiction in a manner not warranted by any authority, and in the highest degree alarming to every considerate man; that such opposition on the part of Virginia to the acts of the General government must beget their enforcement by military power; that this would probably produce civil war; civil war, foreign alliances; and that foreign alliances must necessarily end in subjugation to the powers called...

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