ENGLISH AND SCOTTISH BALLADS

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Page 214 - There lived a wife at Usher's well, And a wealthy wife was she; She had three stout and stalwart sons, And sent them o'er the sea. They hadna been a week from her A week but barely ane, When word came to the carline wife That her three sons were gane. They hadna been a week from her A week but barely three, When word came to the carline wife That her sons she'd never see. ' I wish the wind may never cease, Nor fashes in the flood, Till my three sons come hame to me In earthly flesh and blood!
Page xiii - Tom") WIT AND MIRTH ; or, PILLS TO PURGE MELANCHOLY. Being a Collection of the best Merry Ballads and Songs, Old and New. Fitted to all Humours, having each their proper Tune for either Voice or Instrument ; most of the Songs being new set.
Page 216 - The cock doth craw, the day doth daw, The channerin' worm doth chide ; Gin we be mist out o' our place, A sair pain we maun bide. ' Fare ye weel, my mother dear ! Fareweel to barn and byre ! And fare ye weel, the bonny lass, That kindles my mother's fire.
Page 201 - O I'm come to seek my former vows Ye granted me before." — " O hold your tongue of your former vows, For they will breed sad strife ; 0 hold your tongue of your former vows, For I am become a wife.
Page 112 - For a' the blude that's shed on earth Rins through the springs o' that countrie. Syne they came on to a garden green, And she pu'd an apple frae a tree — * ' Take this for thy wages, true Thomas ; It will give thee the tongue that can never lie.' 'My tongue is mine ain,' true Thomas said; 'A gudely gift ye wad gie to me!
Page 109 - TRUE Thomas lay on Huntlie bank ; A ferlie he spied wi' his ee ; And there he saw a ladye bright, Come riding down by the Eildon Tree. Her skirt was o' the grass-green silk, Her mantle o' the velvet fyne ; At ilka tett of her horse's mane, Hung fifty siller bells and nine.
Page 112 - O they rade on, and farther on, And they waded through rivers aboon the knee, And they saw neither sun nor moon, But they heard the roaring of the sea. It was mirk, mirk night, and there was nae stern light, And they waded through red blude to the knee; For a' the blude, that's shed on earth, Rins through the springs o
Page xxxi - BELL'S Edition, revised. With Preliminary Essay by the Rev. WW SKEAT, MA 4 vols. y. 6d. each. EARLY BALLADS AND SONGS OF THE PEASANTRY OF ENGLAND.
Page 111 - And see not ye that bonny road That winds about the fernie brae ? That is the road to fair Elfland, Where thou and I this night maun gae. " But Thomas, ye maun hold your tongue, Whatever ye may hear or see ; For if you speak word in Elflyn land Ye'll ne'er get back to your ain countrie.
Page 110 - O no, O no, Thomas," she said ; "That name does not belang to me ; I am but the queen of fair Elfland, That am hither come to visit thee.

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