Xpd

Front Cover
Knopf, 1981 - Fiction - 339 pages
37 Reviews
It is 1979. A stolen World War II document kept secret since then is about to surface, propelling the most ruthless secret agents of Great Britain, America, Germany, and the Soviet Union into a desperate battle of wits and violence. Anyone who learns of the paper must die, his file stamped Expedient Demise, or . . . XPD.

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Review: XPD

User Review  - Ravi - Goodreads

I started this book on the 31st of December '15 and it took me some time to finish. This is my first book of 2016 and I must say that the plot was well thought out but it lacked a hero. The author ... Read full review

Review: XPD

User Review  - Goodreads

A mixture of two interests of Deighton, the world of agents and the world of film. Much of it has possible factual basis from published reports and memoirs, mainly places, dates and principal ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
vii
Section 2
ix
Section 3
ix
Copyright

27 other sections not shown

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About the author (1981)

Len (Leonard Cyril) Deighton, the master of the modern spy thriller, was born in London in 1929. He attended the Royal College of Art and served in the Royal Air Force. He married Shirley Thompson in 1960. Deighton has varied work experience. Among other things, he has been an art student, railroad worker, pastry cook, waiter, photographer, and a teacher. Deighton's first of more than a dozen bestsellers, The Ipcress File, appeared in 1962. His spy thrillers are characterized by his careful attention to detail of place, sequence of events, and description of people, providing the reader with the strong sense of actually being there as the story unfolds. His works include two trilogies: the "Game, Set and Match" group--Berlin Game (1984), Mexico Set (1985), and London Match (1986) and the "Hook, Line, and Sinker" group - Spy Hook (1988), Spy Line (1989), and Spy Sinker (1990). Len Deighton also writes television plays and cookbooks.

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