The Tettigidae of North America

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special grant of Mrs. F. G. Logan, 1902 - Insects - 188 pages
 

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Page 12 - In the middle of May [Illinois] the first eggs are laid in the ground, the female accomplishing this act by making a shallow burrow with her ovipositor. The young larvae, hatched from this brood, mature by fall, passing the following winter in the adult state. The broods hatched in late June and July are often immature by the time winter arrives, and we find them hibernating in the pupa state.
Page 55 - ... into sides of crown, the mid-carina showing from above as a very small, slightly projecting tooth. Mid-carina low on the crown, disappearing opposite the middle, or middle of the posterior half, of the eyes. Profile rounded or round-angulate at top, deeply excavate opposite eye, sub-protuberant opposite lower border of eyes, the face more retreating, than in cristatus. Sides of crown sub-parallel, slightly excavate opposite anterior portion of eyes. Mammillae of occiput scarcely distinct, pronotum...
Page 55 - Occiput of head with a pair of nipple-like or mammillate protuberances between the posterior portion of the eyes and the median line. Nomotettix parvus Morse. Small. Vertex of head projecting in advance of eyes about two-thirds the length of an eye, the anterior margin obtuse-angulate, its sides straight, rounding shortly into sides of crown, the mid-carina showing from above as a very small, slightly projecting tooth. Mid-carina low on the crown, disappearing opposite the middle, or middle of the...
Page 12 - ... with her ovipositor. The young larvae, hatched from this brood, mature by fall, passing the following winter in the adult state. The broods hatched in late June and early July are often immature by the time winter arrives, and we find them hibernating in the pupa state. Thus it is that the Tettiginae are about the earliest insects to be found in the spring, appearing as early as March.
Page 11 - The grouse locusts feed upon the vegetable mold or decomposing soil sometimes mixed with alga>, or on the lichens, mosses, tender sprouting grasses, sedges, germinating seeds of plants ,and debris found in such situations. Particularly sought-after morsels are the various colored surface clays and the black muck, consisting of rich vegetable mold. They are ravenous eaters, as one might infer from the dietary list just mentioned, and the fecal excrement, on reaching the end of the abdominal appendages,...
Page 25 - ... of the reach of the victim. There it remains to sap the juices of the host's body. It is found on many species. Among insect pests, ants and bugs are sometimes deadly to them. In a wet ditch in June the writer found a number of small dark-brown ants dragging along the ground a female Tettix ornatus which had just been killed by them. When endeavoring to capture some Tettix at the same place my attention was drawn to a colony of these ants acting in a panicky state of excitement, the cause of...
Page 83 - ... differs in its more robust form with wider and generally more projecting vertex, slightly more prominent mid-carina; in the generally more abruptly forked and wider facial costa, and notably in the enlarged middle femora; the expanded portion of the latter in the male being nearly or quite one-half as broad as long (in ornatus seldom more than one- third); in the female the difference is less noticeable. The humeral angles of the pronotum are more pronounced and the mid-carina is a little more...
Page 79 - ... short, transverse. Thorax entirely without trace of furrows. Wings entirely wanting. Abdomen oval, not longer than the head and thorax together, faintly, microscopically punctate and shining; the. first segment with a hornlike prominence, striated posteriorly; the second segment is a little longer than the first; the third, as long as the first and second together; the following segments short. HABITAT. — Washington, 1). C. Type in Coll. Ashmead. . Described from 3 specimens, taken by Mr. EA...
Page 25 - During the life of these little Tettigians they are more or less constantly in danger of enemies among the arachnida, insecta, and some of the vertebrata. The larva of a red .mite (Trombidian) is one of the most frequent sources of annoyanc'e. Acting as a parasite the Trombidian larva clings on the body and attaches itself out of the reach of the victim. There it remains to sap the juices of the host's body. It is found on many species. Among insect pests, ants and bugs are sometimes deadly to them....
Page 72 - Hancock has found granulafus in Wisconsin on the ground "about prostrate tree trunks, which were molding in decay and covered with greenish lichens and moss. The yellowish and brownish fallen leaves were everywhere scattered over the bed of the forest. Occasionally, when the wind was not blowing, the author was able to mark the presence of Tettigids by the sound made as they jumped upon the dried leaves.

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