Journals of Major Robert Rogers: Containing an Account of the Several Excursions He Made Under the Generals who Commanded Upon the Continent of North America During the Late War ; from which May be Collected the Most Material Circumstances of Every Campaign Upon that Continent, from the Commencement to the Conclusion of the War ; with an Introduction and Notes, and an Appendix Containing Numerous Documents and Papers Relating to the Doings of Major Rogers While Commanding at Michilimackinack, in 1767 ; and His Conduct in the Early Part of the Revolutionary War

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Joel Munsell's Sons, 1883 - Rogers's rangers - 297 pages
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Robert Rogers commander of Roger's Rangers - Unorthodox but successful colonial militia fighting during the French and Indian war.

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Page ii - Journals of Major Robert Rogers : containing An Account of the several Excursions he made under the Generals who commanded upon the Continent of North America, during the late War. From which may be collected The most material Circumstances of every Campaign upon that Continent, from the Commencement to the Conclusion of the War. London : Printed for the Author, And sold by J. Millan, Bookseller, near Whitehall. MDCCLXV.
Page 207 - Regiment in this state reposing special Trust and Confidence in your Fidelity, Courage and good Conduct, I do by Virtue of the Laws of this State, me thereunto enabling, appoint and impower you...
Page 219 - Captain and you are also to observe and follow such Orders and Directions as you shall from time to time receive from...
Page 85 - ... at a due distance, and let a small party waylay the path you came in, lest the enemy should be pursuing. XIX. If, in your return, you have to cross rivers, avoid the usual fords as much as possible, lest the enemy should have discovered, and be there expecting you. XX. If you have to pass...
Page 83 - If you are obliged to receive the enemy's fire, fall, or squat down, till it is over, then rise and discharge at them. If their main body is equal to yours, extend yourselves occasionally; but if superior, be careful to support and strengthen your flanking parties, to make them equal...
Page 84 - ... advantage. XIV When you encamp at night, fix your sentries in such a manner as not to be relieved from the main body till morning, profound secrecy and silence being often of the last importance in these cases. Each sentry, therefore, should consist of six men, two of whom must be constantly alert, and when relieved by their fellows, it should be done without noise...
Page 264 - He was in but an ordinary habit for one of his character. He treated me with great respect ; said he came from London in July, and had spent twenty days with the Congress in Philadelphia, and I forget how many at New York ; had been offered and urged to take a commission in favor of the Colonies ; but, as he was...
Page 274 - In compliance with the request of Congress, contained in your favor of the 25 Inst: and my promise of yesterday, I do myself the honor to inform you therefore sent after him. He was taken at South Amboy, and brought up to New York. Upon examination, he informed me that he came from New Hampshire, the country of his usual abode, where he had left his family ; and pretended he was destined to Philadelphia on business wilh Congress.
Page 264 - ... on half-pay from the crown, he thought proper not to accept it ; that he had fought two battles in Algiers under the Dey ; that he was now on a design to take care of some large grants of land made to him ; that he was going to visit his sister at Moor's Town, and then to return by Merrimac River to visit his wife, whom he had not yet seen since his return from England ; that he had got a pass, or license to travel, from the Continental Congress...
Page 254 - An act to dissolve the marriage between Robert Rogers and Elizabeth, his wife. "Whereas, Elizabeth Rogers of Portsmouth, in the County of Rockingham, and State aforesaid, hath petitioned the General Assembly for said State, setting forth that she was married to the said Robert Rogers about seventeen years ago; for the greater part of which time he had absented himself from and totally neglected to support and maintain her — and had, in the most flagrant manner, in a variety of ways, violated the...

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