Troilus and Cressida

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American book Company, 1905 - Cressida (Fictitious character) - 299 pages
9 Reviews
 

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Review: Troilus and Cressida

User Review  - Susanna - Goodreads

I can see why this very black, very anti-war comedy did not get performed in Britain until the 20th century. It is, however, a great black comedy. Read full review

Review: Troilus and Cressida

User Review  - Emily Harris - Goodreads

Not as easy to like as Shakespeare's more popular plays; as it resists definition itself, so too do its characters. The romance does not hold true, and neither does heroism. A bit dark for me. Read full review

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Page 112 - Though they are made and moulded of things past, And give to dust that is a little gilt More laud than gilt o'er-dusted. The present eye praises the present object : Then marvel not, thou great and complete man, That all the Greeks begin to worship Ajax ; Since things in motion sooner catch the eye Than what not stirs. The cry went once on thee, And still it might, and yet it may again, If thou wouldst not entomb thyself alive, And case thy reputation in thy tent...
Page 54 - How could communities, Degrees in schools, and brotherhoods in cities, Peaceful commerce from dividable shores, The primogenity and due of birth, Prerogative of age, crowns, sceptres, laurels, But by degree, stand in authentic place? Take but degree away, untune that string, And, hark ! what discord follows...
Page 200 - ... should forget their wonted motions, and by irregular volubility turn themselves any way as it might happen; if the prince of the lights of heaven, which now as a giant doth run his unwearied course, should as it were through a languishing faintness begin to stand and to rest himself...
Page 111 - One touch of nature makes the whole world kin, — That all, with one consent, praise new-born gawds, Though they are made and moulded of things past^ And give to dust, that is a little gilt, More laud than gilt o'er-dusted.
Page 111 - For honour travels in a strait so narrow, Where one but goes abreast : Keep then the path ; For emulation hath a thousand sons, That one by one pursue : If you give way, Or hedge aside from the direct forthright, Like to an entered tide, they all rush by, And leave you hindmost...
Page 64 - Take but degree away, untune that string, And, hark, what discord follows! each thing meets In mere oppugnancy: the bounded waters Should lift their bosoms higher than the shores And make a sop of all this solid globe: Strength should be lord of imbecility, And the rude son should strike his father dead: Force should be right; or rather, right and wrong, Between whose endless jar justice resides, Should lose their names, and so should justice too.
Page 64 - Force should be right; or rather, right and wrong, Between whose endless jar justice resides, Should lose their names, and so should justice too. Then...
Page 77 - Twixt right and wrong ; for pleasure and revenge Have ears more deaf than adders to the voice Of any true decision.
Page 112 - Does thoughts unveil in their dumb cradles. There is a mystery (with whom relation Durst never meddle) in the soul of state ; Which hath an operation more divine, Than breath, or pen, can give expressure to...
Page 54 - Then every thing includes itself in power, Power into will, will into appetite; And appetite, an universal wolf, So doubly seconded with will and power, Must make perforce an universal prey, And last eat up himself.

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