Shah Abbas: The Ruthless King Who Became an Iranian Legend

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I.B.Tauris, Apr 2, 2014 - History - 288 pages
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A ruthless autocrat who blinded and killed his own sons, but was revered as a hero by his own people. A brilliant warrior who restored his nation’s pride and territorial integrity by waging war on the foreign occupying forces, but chose an English knight to be his ambassador in the West. An aesthete whose artistic patronage made his country a centre of art and culture, whose religious devotion combined with realpolitik, helped convert Shi’i Islam into a geoploitcal phenomenon. Arguably Iran’s greatest ruler since the Arab invasion in the 7th century AD, Shah Abbas was an immensely complex and much misunderstood character who, despite often contradictory behaviour, changed the face of the Middle East forever.
 

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Contents

The Birth of a Shii State
1
2 A Turbolent Childhood and the Seizure of Power
15
3 Abbas Takes Control
31
4 The Recovery of Khurasan from the Uzbeks
47
5 English Adventures at the Service of Shah Abbas
53
Khurasan the Persian Gulf and a Challenge to the Ottomans
65
7 Abbas Expels the Ottomans
75
8 The Search for European Allies
85
14 Abbas the Man and the King
155
15 The Court of Shah Abbas
165
16 The Throne and Mosque Alliance
181
17 The City that was Half the World
193
18 The Merchant King
209
19 Shah Abbas and the Arts
217
20 The Later Safavids
227
Conclusion
239

9 Pressure on the Gulf Mass Deportations and the Murder of a Son
99
the Capture of Hormuz
113
the Capture of Qandahar and Baghdad
131
12 A Conflict of Envoys
137
13 The English Embassy and the Death of Abbas
143

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