Lost in Space: Geographies of Science Fiction

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Rob Kitchin, James Kneale
A&C Black, Dec 23, 2005 - Literary Criticism - 224 pages
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Science fiction - one of the most popular literary, cinematic and televisual genres - has received increasing academic attention in recent years. For many theorists science fiction opens up a space in which the here-and-now can be made strange or remade; where virtual reality and cyborg are no longer gimmicks or predictions, but new spaces and subjects.

Lost in space brings together an international collection of authors to explore the diverse geographies of spaceexploring imagination, nature, scale, geopolitics, modernity, time, identity, the body, power relations and the representation of space.

The essays explore the writings of a broad selection of writers, including J.G.Ballard, Frank Herbert, Marge Piercy, Kim Stanley Robinson, Mary Shelley and Neal Stephenson, and films from Bladerunner to Dark City, The Fly, The Invisible Man and Metropolis.
 

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Contents

alternative histories contingent geographies
17
Geographys conquest of history in The Diamond Age
39
Space technology and Neal Stephensons science fiction
57
Geographies of power and social relations in Marge Piercys
74
geographical imaginings
90
city space and SF horror movies
104
the hysterical materialism
123
motor
136
familiar geographies science
156
Murray Bookchin on Mars The production of nature in
167
Frankenstein food factishes and fiction
180
References
193
Index
209
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Atlas of Cyberspace
Martin Dodge,Rob Kitchin
No preview available - 2001
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About the author (2005)

Rob Kitchin is Lecturer in Human Geography at the National University of Ireland, Maynooth. James Kneale is Lecturer in Human Geography at University College London.

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