The City After The Automobile: An Architect's Vision

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Westview Press, Aug 25, 2009 - Social Science - 320 pages
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In an age of virtual offices, urban flight, and planned gated communities, are cities becoming obsolete? In this passionate manifesto, Moshe Safdie argues that as crucibles for creative, social, and political interaction, vital cities are an organic and necessary part of human civilization. If we are to rescue them from dispersal and decay, we must first revise our definition of what constitutes a city.Unlike many who believe that we must choose between cities and suburbs, between mass transit and highways, between monolithic highrises and panoramic vistas, Safdie envisions a way to have it all. Effortless mobility throughout a region of diverse centers, residential communities, and natural open spaces is the key to restoring the rich public life that cities once provided while honoring our profound desire for privacy, flexibility, and freedom. With innovations such as transportation nodes, elevated moving sidewalks, public utility cars, and buildings designed to maximize daylight, views, and personal interaction, Safdie's proposal challenges us all to create a more satisfying and humanistic environment.

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THE CITY AFTER THE AUTOMOBILE

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Some contemporary urban realities are confronted head-on here, while others are ignored, making it difficult to decide whether Safdie's ideas are visionary or merely silly. Much of this book is an ... Read full review

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Brève histoire du progrès
Ronald Wright
No preview available - 2006
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About the author (2009)

Moshe Safdie first attracted attention as the architect of Habitat ’67 in Montreal. Since then he has designed major public buildings, communities, and cities worldwide. A former director of graduate urban design and professor of architecture at Harvard, he has received numerous awards, has been published extensively, and runs an international architecture practice with main offices in Boston and Jerusalem. Moshe Safdie first attracted attention as the architect of Habitat ’67 in Montreal. Since then he has designed major public buildings, communities, and cities worldwide. A former director of graduate urban design and professor of architecture at Harvard, he has received numerous awards, has been published extensively, and runs an international architecture practice with main offices in Boston and Jerusalem. Moshe Safdie first attracted attention as the architect of Habitat ’67 in Montreal. Since then he has designed major public buildings, communities, and cities worldwide. A former director of graduate urban design and professor of architecture at Harvard, he has received numerous awards, has been published extensively, and runs an international architecture practice with main offices in Boston and Jerusalem.

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