Debunking Economics: The Naked Emperor of the Social Sciences

Front Cover
Zed Books, Jul 28, 2001 - Business & Economics - 335 pages

Debunking Economics exposes what many non-economists may have suspected and a minority of economists have long known: that economic theory is not only unpalatable, but also plain wrong. Many of the most cherished notions of conventional economics are based on reasoning that is internally inconsistent.

Debunking Economics explains why economists think the way they do, and points out the flaws in their thinking which they either don't realize, don't appreciate, or just plain ignore. Most of these flaws were established by dissident academic economists decades ago, yet modern economics pretends that it can continue with 'business as usual'. In a profound irony, Debunking Economics shows that a discipline which labours the word 'rational' may be the most irrational of all.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

No more Mr Nice Guy
1
Foundations
21
The calculus of hedonism
23
The price of everything and the value of nothing
54
Size does matter
85
To each according to his contribution
110
Complexities
127
The holy war over capital
129
The sum of the parts
188
The price is not right
214
Alternatives
241
Finance and economic breakdown
243
Dont shoot me Im only the piano
258
Nothing to lose but their minds
269
There are alternatives
300
References
314

There is madness in their method
148
Lets do the Time Warp again
165

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

Steve Keen is an academic economist based in Sydney, Australia. Prior to commencing his academic career, Steve was a government policy adviser, a journalist, computer database designer, and overseas aid worker. He has numerous publications in academic journals, and has written and presented more popular pieces for Australian media, including the Australian, Sydney Morning Herald, ABC Radio and Radio National.
Steve Keen is an academic economist based in Sydney, Australia. Prior to commencing his academic career, Steve was a government policy adviser, a journalist, computer database designer, and overseas aid worker. He has numerous publications in academic journals, and has written and presented more popular pieces for Australian media, including the Australian, Sydney Morning Herald, ABC Radio and Radio National.

Bibliographic information