The Cambridge History of Law in America, Volume 1

Front Cover
Michael Grossberg, Christopher Tomlins
Cambridge University Press, Apr 28, 2008 - History - 760 pages
Volume I of the Cambridge History of Law in America begins the account of law in America with the very first moments of European colonization and settlement of the North American landmass. It follows those processes across two hundred years to the eventual creation and stabilization of the American republic. The book discusses the place of law in regard to colonization and empire, indigenous peoples, government and jurisdiction, population migrations, economic and commercial activity, religion, the creation of social institutions, and revolutionary politics. The Cambridge History of Law in America has been made possible by the generous support of the American Bar Foundation.
 

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Contents

1 Law Colonization Legitimation and the European Background
1
2 The Law of Native Americans to 1815
32
3 English Settlement and Local Governance
63
4 Legal Communications and Imperial Governance
104
5 Regionalism in Early American Law
144
6 Penality and the Colonial Project
178
7 Law Population Labor
211
8 THE FRAGMENTED LAWS OF SLAVERY IN THE COLONIAL AND REVOLUTIONARY ERAS
253
11 The Transformation of Law and Economy in Early America
365
12 Law and Commerce 15801815
400
13 Law and the Origins of the American Revolution
447
14 Confederation and Constitution
482
15 The Consolidation of the Early Federal System 17911812
518
16 Magistrates Common Law Lawyers Legislators
555
BIBLIOGRAPHIC ESSAYS
593
Notes on Contributors in order of appearance
695

9 The Transformation of Domestic Law
288
10 Law and Religion in Colonial America
324

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Page 676 - Edmund S. Morgan, American Slavery, American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia (New York: WW Norton & Company, 1975); Orlando Patterson, Slavery and Social Death: A Comparative Study (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1982). 21. Joan W. Scott, "The Evidence of Experience," Critical Inquiry 17 (Summer 1991): 776.

About the author (2008)

Michael Grossberg is the Sally M. Reahard Professor of History and a Professor of Law at Indiana University. His research focuses on the relationship between law and social change, particularly the intersection of law and family.

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