A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening, Adapted to North America: With a View to the Improvement of Country Residences ... With Remarks on Rural Architecture

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Orange Judd Company [c1875], 1875 - Architecture, Domestic - 592 pages
 

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Page 262 - Behold, the Assyrian was a cedar in Lebanon with fair branches, and with a shadowing shroud, and of an high stature ; and his top was among the thick boughs.
Page 136 - The quivering glimmer of sun and rill With a sudden flash on the eye is thrown, Like the ray that streams from the...
Page 362 - All things to man's delightful use: the roof Of thickest covert, was inwoven shade, Laurel and myrtle, and what higher grew Of firm and fragrant leaf; on either side Acanthus and each odorous bushy shrub Fenced up the verdant wall, each beauteous flower, Iris all hues, roses, and jessamine, Reared high their flourished heads between, and wrought Mosaic; under foot the violet, Crocus, and hyacinth with rich inlay Broidered the ground, more coloured than with stone Of costliest emblem: other creature...
Page 69 - Consult the genius of the place in all ; That tells the waters or to rise or fall, Or helps the ambitious hill the heavens to scale, Or scoops in circling theatres the vale ; Calls in the country, catches opening glades, Joins willing woods, and varies shades from shades ; Now breaks, or now directs...
Page 250 - Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont, the White Pine abounds in various situations, adapting itself to every variety of soil, from dry, gravelly upland, to swamps constantly wet. Michaux measured two trunks near the river Kennebec, one of which was 154 feet long, and 54 inches in diameter ; the other 144 feet long, and 44 inches in diameter, at three feet from the ground. Dr. Dwight also mentions a specimen on the Kattskill 249 feet long, and several on the Unadilla 200 feet long, and three in diameter.*...
Page 161 - ... size. The leaves are smooth on both surfaces, heart-shaped at the base, very acuminate, and doubly and irregularly toothed. The petioles are slightly twisted, and the leaves are almost as tremulous as those of the aspen. It is a beautiful small tree for ornamental plantations. The common Black or Sweet birch. (B. lenta.) This is the sort most generally known by the name of the birch, and is widely diffused over the middle and southern states. In color and appearance the bark much resembles that...
Page 235 - I have never succeeded in obtaining shoots by wounding their surface and covering them with the earth. No cause can be assigned for their existence : they are peculiar to the Cypress, and begin to appear when it is twenty or twenty-five feet in height; they are not made use of except by the negroes for bee-hives." " The foliage is open, light, and of a fresh, agreeable tint; each leaf is four or five inches long, and consists of two parallel rows of leaflets, upon a common stem. The leaflets are...
Page 169 - The brilliant white of the leaves beneath, forms a striking contrast with the Bright green above ; and the alternate reflection of the two surfaces in the water, heightening the beauty of this- wonderful moving mirror, aids in forming an enchanting picture, which, during my long excursions in a canoe in these regions of solitude and silence, I contemplated with unwearied admiration."* There, on those fine, deep, alluvial soils, it often attains twelve or fifteen feet in circumference.
Page 320 - Architectural beauty must be considered conjointly with the beauty of the landscape or situation. Buildings of almost every description, and particularly those for the habitation of man, will be considered by the mind of taste, not only as architectural objects of greater or less merit, but as component parts of the general scene; united with the surrounding lawn, embosomed in tufts of trees and...
Page 279 - Ivy it attaches itself to whatever it can lay hold of, by the little rootlets which spring out of the branches ; and its foliage, when it clothes thickly a high wall, or folds itself in clustering wreaths around the trunk and branches of an open tree, is extremely handsome and showy. Although the leaves are not evergreen, like those of the Ivy, yet in autumn they far surpass those of that plant in the rich and gorgeous coloring which they then assume. Numberless trees may be seen in the country by...

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