The Black Death: A History of Plagues, 1345-1730

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Tempus, 2001 - History - 192 pages
By 1340, Europe was beset by a host of problems. Even the ploughing of marginal land had failed to produce enough food to feed the ever-growing population. Poverty, unemployment, and vagrancy were all on the increase. However, by 1400 the situation had changed. There had been a dramatic change but from a wholly unforeseen and unexpected quarter: the Black Death. This horrific disease ripped through towns, villages and families. Men, women, children, young and old succumbed to a painful, drawn out death as pustules, abscesses and boils erupted over their bodies. Within a few decades this virulent and unknown disease had wiped out up to half the population.

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User Review  - EmmaDobbs - LibraryThing

Very readable and interesting. Good for those interested in the medieval period and how the Black Death affected European culture. Read full review

Contents

Acknowledgements
7
DEATH AT THE DOOR
27
DANCING WITH DEATH
57
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

William G. Naphy is Professor of History at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. He is a well-known scholar of the Protestant Reformation in Geneva and the author of numerous articles.

Andrew Spicer is at the University of West England

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