Language Change: Progress Or Decay?

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, 2001 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 312 pages
2 Reviews
This book gives a lucid and up-to-date overview of language change, discussing where our evidence about language change comes from, how and why changes happen, and how languages begin and end. It considers both changes that occurred long ago, and those currently in progress. This substantially revised third edition includes two new chapters on change of meaning and grammaticalization. New sections have been added to other chapters, as well as over 150 new references. The work remains nontechnical in style and accessible to the reader with no previous knowledge of linguistics.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Language progresses with time. If a language does not change it becomes stagnant and dies. Now a days English has encompassed every field including science , arts literature, religion social contact and means of communication in whole world. It is claimed to be the language of world by 2020. In fact it looks possible and rational, as it has yet covered almost everything.
when we take a glimpse upon its accomplishment we come across, it has
 

Contents

The everwhirling wheel The inevitability of change
3
Collecting up clues Piecing together the evidence
19
Charting the changes Studying changes in progress
37
Spreading the word From person to person
55
Conflicting loyalties Opposing social pressures
68
Catching on and taking off How sound changes spread through a language
84
Caught in the web How syntactic changes work through a language
98
The wheels of language Grammaticalization
112
The Mad Hatters teaparty Chain reaction changes
183
Development and breakdown Child language and language disorders
201
Language birth How languages begin
217
Language death How languages end
235
Progress or decay? Assessing the situation
249
Symbols and technical terms
261
Notes and suggestions for further reading
263
References
281

Spinning away Change of meaning
120
The reason why Sociolinguistic causes of change
133
Doing what comes naturally Inherent causes of language change
153
Repairing the patterns Therapeutic changes
169
Acknowledgments
304
Index
305
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information