World of Our Fathers

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NYU Press, Oct 1, 2005 - History - 768 pages
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A new 30th Anniversary paperback edition of an award-winning classic.

Winner of the National Book Award, 1976

World of Our Fathers traces the story of Eastern Europe's Jews to America over four decades. Beginning in the 1880s, it offers a rich portrayal of the East European Jewish experience in New York, and shows how the immigrant generation tried to maintain their Yiddish culture while becoming American. It is essential reading for those interested in understanding why these forebears to many of today's American Jews made the decision to leave their homelands, the challenges these new Jewish Americans faced, and how they experienced every aspect of immigrant life in the early part of the twentieth century.

This invaluable contribution to Jewish literature and culture is now back in print in a new paperback edition, which includes a new foreword by noted author and literary critic Morris Dickstein.

 

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Contents

Origins
5
Departure and Arrival
26
10
42
THE EAST SIDE
67
Disorder and Early Progress
119
11
128
Slum and Shop
148
The Way They Lived Then
169
The Yiddish Word 4 I 7
417
The Yiddish Theatre
460
The ScholarIntellectuals
497
The Yiddish Press 5 18
518
Journeys Outward
555
177
560
At Ease in America?
608
Questions upon Questions
639

The Restlessness of Learning
225
Growing Up in the Ghetto
256
Jewish Labor Jewish Socialism
287
Breakup of the Left 32 5
325
Getting into American Politics
360
Acknowledgments
649
Glossary of Yiddish Terms
683
Index
695
183
703
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About the author (2005)

Irving Howe (1920-1993) played a pivotal role in American intellectual life for over five decades, from the 1940s to the 1990s. Best known for World of Our Fathers, Howe also won acclaim for his prodigious output of illuminating essays on American culture and as an indefatigable promoter of democratic socialism. He was the founding editor of Dissent, the journal he edited for nearly forty years.

Morris Dickstein is Distinguished Professor of English and Theatre and Senior Fellow of the Center for the Humanities at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He is the author of several books, including Leopards in the Temple: The Transformation of American Fiction, 1945-1970

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