A Narrative of the Campaign of the British Army in Spain: Commanded by His Excellency Licut.-General Sir John Moore, K. B.

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J. Johnson, 1809 - Peninsular War, 1807-1814 - 324 pages
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Page 300 - ... is impossible for me to detail to your Lordship the events which have taken place, since I had the honour to address you from Astorga on the 3 1st December.
Page 225 - The troops, though not unacquainted with the irreparable loss they had sustained, were not dismayed, but, by the most determined bravery, not only repelled every attempt of the enemy to gain ground, but actually forced him to retire, although he bad brought up fresh troops in support of those originally engaged.
Page 295 - The diversion made by our march on Sahagun, though at great risk to ourselves, has been complete ; it remains to be seen what advantage the Spaniards in the south will be able to take of it; but the march of the French on Badajoz was stopped when its advanced guard had reached Talaveira de la Reine, and every thing disposable is now turned in this direction.
Page 222 - During the season of repose, his time was devoted to the care and instruction of the Officer and Soldier ; in war, he courted service in every quarter of the globe. Regardless of personal considerations, he esteemed that to which his Country called him, the post of honour ; and by his undaunted spirit, and unconquerable perseverance, he pointed the way to victory. " His Country, the object of his latest solicitude, will rear a monument to his lamented memory ; and the Commander-in-chief feels he...
Page 217 - He has been long with me, - and I know him most worthy of it.' He then asked Major Colborne, 'if the French were beaten ? ' And, on being told they were on every point, he said, 'It is a great satisfaction for me to know we have beaten the French. - Is Paget in the room?
Page 301 - Your lordship knows, that had I followed my own opinion, as a military man, I should have retired with the army from Salamanca. The Spanish armies were then beaten, there was no Spanish force to which we could unite...
Page 217 - He thanked the Surgeons for their trouble. Captains Percy and Stanhope, two of his Aides-de-camp, then came into the room. He spoke kindly to both, and asked Percy .f, if all his Aides-de" camp were well? " After some interval he said, * Stanhope"^ — remember me to your
Page 97 - Madrid, and to have shared the fortunes of the Spanish nation. If I could not have sustained myself there, I thought, by placing myself behind the Tagus, I might give the broken armies, and the people of Spain, if they had patriotism left, an opportunity to assemble round me, and to march to the relief of the capital. That this was my intention, is known to the officers with me, who are in my confidence ; it is known also to lord Castlereagh, to whom I had imparted it in one of my late letters.
Page 159 - I wish it to be apparent to the whole world, as it is to every individual of the army, that we have done every thing in our power in support of the Spanish cause, and that we do not abandon it until long after the Spaniards had abandoned us.
Page 298 - There is no means of carriage. The people run away, the villages are deserted, and I have been obliged to destroy great part of the ammunition and military stores. For the same reason I am obliged to leave the sick. In short, my sole object is to save the army. We must all make forced marches to the coast, from the scarcity of provisions and to be before the enemy, who, by roads upon our flanks, may otherwise intercept us...

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