The Russo-Turkish campaigns of 1828 and 1829: with a view of the present state of affairs in the East

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Redfield, 1854 - Crimean War, 1853-1856 - 360 pages
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Page 340 - I never will permit an attempt at the reconstruction of a Byzantine Empire, or such an extension of Greece as would render her a powerful State; still less will I permit the breaking up of Turkey into little republics, asylums for the Kossuths and Mazzinis, and other revolutionists of Europe, rather than submit to any of these arrangements I would go to war, and as long as I have a man and a musket left would carry it on.
Page 342 - As to Egypt, I quite understand the importance to England of that territory. I can then only say, that if, in the event of a distribution of the Ottoman succession upon the fall of the Empire, you should take possession of Egypt, I shall have no objections to offer. I would say the same thing of Candia: that island might suit you, and I do not know why it should not become an English possession...
Page 300 - ... ceux qu'elle a eus et qu'elle désire encore avoir pour la Turquie. Elle doit chercher à en obtenir la réparation et à se prémunir contre leur renouvellement à l'avenir.
Page 312 - Dardanelles. Par cette attitude avancée, les deux Puissances nous ont placés sous le poids d'une démonstration comminatoire, qui comme nous le leur avions fait pressentir, devait ajouter à la crise de nouvelles complications. En présence du refus de la Porte, appuyé par la manifestation de la France et de l'Angleterre, il nous devient plus que jamais impossible de modifier les résolutions qu'en avait fait dépendre l'Empereur. En conséquence, Sa Majesté Impériale vient d'envoyer au corps...
Page 331 - The emperor's words and manner, although still very kind, showed that his majesty had no intention of speaking to me of the demonstration which he is about to make in the south. He said, however, at first with a little hesitation, but, as he proceeded, in an open...
Page 338 - It can hardly be otherwise but that the Sovereign who insists with such pertinacity upon the impending fall of a neighbouring State, must have settled in his own mind that the hour, if not of its dissolution, at all events for its dissolution, must be at hand.
Page 332 - I did not inherit those visions — those intentions, if you like to call them so. On the contrary, my country is so vast, so happily circumstanced in every way, that it would be unreasonable in me to desire more territory or more power than I possess. On the contrary, I am the first to tell you that our great, perhaps our only danger, is that which could arise from an extension given to an empire already too large.
Page 342 - Principalities are,' he said, 'in fact an independent State under my protection ; this might so continue. Servia might receive the same form of government. So again with Bulgaria. There seems to be no reason why this province should not form an independent State. As to Egypt, I quite understand the importance to England of that territory. I can then only say, that if. in the event of a distribution of the Ottoman succession upon the fall of the empire, you should take possession of Egypt, I shall...
Page 333 - I beg you to believe), he may suddenly die upon our hands (nous rester rur les bras) ; we cannot resuscitate what is dead ; if the Turkish empire falls, it falls to rise no more ; and I put it to you, therefore, whether it is not better to be provided beforehand for a contingency, than to incur the chaos, confusion, and the certainty of a European war, all of which must attend the catastrophe if it should occur unexpectedly, and before some ulterior system has been sketched? This is the point to...
Page 340 - Well, there are several things which I never will tolerate: I will begin by ourselves. I will not tolerate the permanent occupation of Constantinople by the Russians; having said this, I will say that it never shall be held by the English, or French, or any other great nation. Again, I never will permit an attempt at the reconstruction of a Byzantine Empire, or such an extension of Greece as would render her a powerful State; still less will I permit the breaking up of Turkey into little republics,...

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