The Japanese Colonial Empire, 1895-1945

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Princeton University Press, 1984 - History - 540 pages
2 Reviews

These essays, by thirteen specialists from Japan and the United States, provide a comprehensive view of the Japanese empire from its establishment in 1895 to its liquidation in 1945. They offer a variety of perspectives on subjects previously neglected by historians: the origin and evolution of the formal empire (which comprised Taiwan, Korea, Karafuto. the Kwantung Leased Territory, and the South Seas Mandated Islands), the institutions and policies by which it was governed, and the economic dynamics that impelled it. Seeking neither to justify the empire nor to condemn it, the contributors place it in the framework of Japanese history and in the context of colonialism as a global phenomenon. Contributors are Ching-chih Chen. Edward I-te Chen, Bruce Cumings, Peter Duus, Lewis H. Gann, Samuel Pao-San Ho, Marius B. Jansen, Mizoguchi Toshiyuki, Ramon H. Myers, Mark R. Peattie, Michael E. Robinson, E. Patricia Tsurumi. Yamada Sabur?, Yamamoto Y'zo'.

 

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Contents

II
3
III
53
IV
61
V
80
VI
128
VII
172
VIII
213
IX
240
XII
347
XIII
399
XIV
420
XV
455
XVI
478
XVII
497
XVIII
526
XIX
529

X
275
XI
312

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About the author (1984)

Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and also curator of the East Asian archives.

Mark R. Peattie is professor emeritus at the University of Massachusetts at Boston and a research fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. He is the author of several books including, Sunburst: The Rise of Japanese Naval Air Power, 1909-1941.

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