The World of Odysseus

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New York Review of Books, 2002 - History - 205 pages
4 Reviews
The World of Odysseus is a concise and penetrating account of the society that gave birth to the Iliad and the Odyssey--a book that provides a vivid picture of the Greek Dark Ages, its men and women, works and days, morals and values. Long celebrated as a pathbreaking achievement in the social history of the ancient world, M.I. Finley's brilliant study remains, as classicist Bernard Knox notes in his introduction to this new edition, "as indispensable to the professional as it is accessible to the general reader"--a fundamental companion for students of Homer and Homeric Greece.
 

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User Review  - mbmackay - LibraryThing

Shows how Homer reflects a time closer to his own century than to the time several hundred years earlier that the real events actually occurred. Read in Samoa Mar 2003 Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stillatim - LibraryThing

Ah, for the golden age of academic writing. Is it beautiful? No. But it is clear, concise and argumentative. No 'pointing out a problem' stuff here; Finley just gives you the answers as he sees them ... Read full review

Contents

Homer and the Greeks
5
Bards and Heroes
18
Wealth and Labor
46
Household Kin and Community
71
Morals and Values
109
The World of Odysseus Revisited
147
Schliemanns TroyOne Hundred Years After
166
Bibliographical Essay
187
Index of Passages Quoted
197
General Index
201
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About the author (2002)

M. I. Finley (1912-1986), the son of Nathan Finkelstein and Anna Katzellenbogen, was born in New York City. He graduated from Syracuse University at the age of fifteen and received an MA in public law from Columbia, before turning to the study of ancient history. During the thirties, Finley taught at Columbia and City College and developed an interest in the sociology of the ancient world that was shaped in part by his association with members of the Frankfurt School who were working in exile in America. In 1952, when he was teaching at Rutgers, Finley was summoned before the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee and asked whether he had ever been a member of the Communist Party. He refused to answer, invoking the Fifth Amendment; by the end of the year he had been fired from the university by a unanimous vote of its trustees. Unable to find work in the US, Finley moved to England, where he taught for many years at Cambridge, helping to redirect the focus of classical education from a narrow emphasis on philology to a wider concern with culture, economics, and society. He became a British subject in 1962 and was knighted in 1979. Among Finley's best-known works are The Ancient Economy, Ancient Slavery and Modern Ideology, and The World of Odysseus.

Bernard Knox (1914-2010) was an English classicist. He was the first director of Harvard's Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC. Among his many books are The Heroic Temper, The Oldest Dead White European Males, and Backing into the Future: The Classical Tradition and Its Renewal. He is the editor of The Norton Book of Classical Literature and wrote the introductions and notes for Robert Fagles's translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey.

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