Tyburn Tree: Its History and Annals

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Brown, Langham & Company, 1908 - Capital punishment - 292 pages
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Page 158 - ... grown so crazy and stiff in his joints, that he can now do little more than sit in his cave's mouth, grinning at pilgrims as they go by, and biting his nails because he cannot come at them.
Page 240 - He stopt at the George for a bottle of sack, And promised to pay for it when he came back. His waistcoat, and stockings, and breeches, were white; His cap had a new cherry ribbon to tie't. The maids to the doors and the balconies ran, And said, "Lack-a-day, he's a proper young man!
Page 221 - ... the right of every subject to demand it. That writ, rendered more actively remedial by the statute of Charles II., but founded upon the broad basis of Magna Charta, is the principal bulwark of English liberty ; and if ever temporary circumstances, or the doubtful plea of political necessity, shall lead men to look on its denial with apathy, the most distinguishing characteristic of our constitution will be effaced.
Page 46 - ... there is still a vast difference betwixt the slovenly butchering of a man, and the fineness of a stroke that separates the head from the body, and leaves it standing in its place. A man may be capable, as Jack Ketch's wife said of his servant, of a plain piece of work, a bare hanging; but to make a malefactor die sweetly was only belonging to her husband.
Page 246 - ... the gentleman two letters of excuses, which, with less wit than the epistles of Voiture, had ten times more natural and easy politeness in the turn of their expression. In the postscript, he appointed a meeting at Tyburn at twelve at night, where the gentleman might purchase again any trifles he had lost; and my friend has been blamed for not accepting the rendezvous, as it seemed liable to be construed by ill-natured people into a doubt of the honour of a man, who had given him all the satisfaction...
Page 239 - Letters written to and for particular Friends, on the most important Occasions. Directing not only the requisite Style and Forms to be observed in writing Familiar Letters; but how to think and act justly and prudently, in the common Concerns of Human Life.
Page 269 - It having been argued that this was an improvement, — " No, sir," said he, eagerly, " it is not an improvement ; they object, that the old method drew together a number of spectators. Sir, executions are intended to draw spectators. If they do not draw spectators, they don't answer their purpose. The old method was most satisfactory to all parties ; the publick was gratified by a procession ; the criminal was supported by it ~. Why is all this to be swept away ?
Page 252 - When the rope was put round his neck, he turned pale, but recovered his countenance instantly, and was but seven minutes from leaving the coach, to the signal given for striking the stage. As the machine was new, they were not ready at it : his toes touched it, and he suffered a little, having had time, by their bungling, to raise his cap ; but the executioner pulled it down again, and they pulled his legs, so that he was soon out of pain, and quite dead in four minutes.
Page 166 - The execution of Justice in England for maintenance of publique and Christian peace, against certeine stirrers of sedition and adherents to the traytors and enemies of the Realme, without any persecution of them for questions of religion, as is falsely reported and published by the fautors and fosterers of their treasons, xvii decemb.
Page 266 - Street muse with such verses as these — that is, if I remember them correctly : — ' A Sandwich favourite was this fair, And her he dearly loved ; By whom six children had, we hear ; This story fatal proved. ' A clergyman, O wicked one, In Covent Garden shot her ; No time to cry upon her God, It's hoped He's not forgot her.

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