The Book of Fallacies: From Unfinished Papers of Jeremy Bentham

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J. and H. L. Hunt, 1824 - Fallacies (Logic) - 411 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
31
III
127
IV
190
V
213
VI
359

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Page 98 - Will you to the utmost of your power maintain the laws of God, the true profession of the gospel, and the protestant reformed religion established by law ? And will you preserve unto the bishops and clergy of this realm, and to the churches committed to their charge, all such rights and privileges as by law do or shall appertain unto them, or any of them? — King or queen. All this I promise to do.
Page 101 - Will you solemnly promise and swear to govern the people of this kingdom of England, and the dominions thereto belonging, according to the statutes in parliament agreed on, and the laws and customs of the same?
Page 99 - And will you preserve unto the bishops and " clergy of this realm, and to the churches committed to " their charge, all such rights and privileges as by law do " or shall appertain unto them, or any of them ? — King
Page 99 - And will you maintain and preserve inviolably the settlement of the Church of England, and the doctrine, worship, discipline, and government thereof, as by law established, within the kingdoms of England and Ireland, the dominion of Wales, and town of Berwick upon Tweed, and the territories thereunto belonging...
Page 68 - Let them but assign for the period of superior wisdom any determinate period whatsoever, not only will the groundlessness of the notion be apparent, (class being compared with class in that period and the present one,) but, unless the antecedent period be, comparatively speaking, a very modern one, so wide will be the disparity, and to such an amount in favour of modern times, that, in comparison...
Page 116 - The measure proposed implies a distrust of the members of His Majesty's Government ; but so great is their integrity, so complete their disinterestedness, so uniformly do they prefer the public advantage to their own, that such a measure is altogether unnecessary. Their disapproval is sufficient to warrant an opposition ; precautions can only be requisite where danger is apprehended : here, the high character of the individuals in question is a sufficient guarantee against any ground of alarm.
Page 273 - The source of that corruption to which the honourable member alludes, is in the minds of the people ; so rank and extensive is that corruption, that no political reform can have any effect in removing it. Instead of reforming others — instead of reforming the State, the Constitution, and every thing that is most excellent, let each man reform himself!
Page 112 - FALLACY. — Mr. Bentham explains the self-trumpeter's fallacy as follows : "There are certain men in office who, in discharge of their functions, arrogate to themselves a degree of probity, which is to exclude all imputations and all inquiry. Their assertions are to be deemed equivalent to proof, their virtues are...
Page 115 - The object of laudatory personalities is to effect the rejection of a measure on account of the alleged good character of those who oppose it, and the argument advanced is, ' The measure is rendered unnecessary by the virtues of those who are in power — their opposition is a sufficient authority for the rejection of the measure.
Page 124 - In proportion to the degree of efficiency with which a man suffers these instruments of deception to operate upon his mind he enables bad men to exercise over him a sort of power, the thought of which ought to cover him with shame. Allow this argument the effect of a conclusive one...

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