The Works of Jonathan Swift: Memoirs of Jonathan Swift, D. D

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A. Constable, 1814 - English literature
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Page 258 - But what success Vanessa met, Is to the world a secret yet. Whether the nymph, to please her swain, Talks in a high romantic strain ; Or whether he at last descends To act with less seraphic ends ; Or to compound the business, whether They temper love and books together ; Must never to mankind be told, Nor shall the conscious Muse unfold.
Page 465 - Cassius. He reads much ; He is a great observer and he looks Quite through the deeds of men ; he loves no plays, As thou dost, Antony ; he hears no music ; Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort As if he mock'd himself and scorn'd his spirit That could be moved to smile at any thing.
Page 464 - tis his will : Let but the commons hear this testament, (Which, pardon me, I do not mean to read) And they would go and kiss dead Caesar's wounds, And dip their napkins in his sacred blood ; Yea, beg a hair of him for memory, And, dying, mention it within their wills, Bequeathing it, as a rich legacy, Unto their issue.
Page 270 - That's very strange ; but, if you had not supped, I must have got something for you. Let me see, what should I have had ? A couple of lobsters ; ay, that would have done very well ; two shillings ; tarts, a shilling ; but you will drink a glass of wine with me, though you supped so much before your usual time only to spare my pocket I' ' No, we had rather talk with you than drink with you.
Page 494 - In the poetical works of Dr. Swift there is not much upon which the critic can exercise his powers. They are often humorous, almost always light, and have the qualities which recommend such compositions, easiness and gaiety. They are, for the most part, what their author intended. The diction is correct, the numbers are smooth, and the rhymes exact. There seldom occurs a hardlaboured expression, or a redundant epithet; all his verses exemplify his own definition of a good style; they consist of "proper...
Page 502 - ... the peruser of Swift wants little previous knowledge: it will be sufficient that he is acquainted with common words and common things; he is neither required to mount elevations, nor to explore profundities; his passage is always on a level, along solid ground, without asperities, without obstruction.
Page 38 - To thee I owe that fatal bent of mind, Still to unhappy restless thoughts inclined ; To thee, what oft I vainly strive to hide, That scorn of fools, by fools mistook for pride ; From thee whatever virtue takes its rise, Grows a misfortune, or becomes a vice...
Page 501 - His Tale of a Tub has little resemblance to his other pieces. It exhibits a vehemence and rapidity of mind, a copiousness of images, and vivacity of diction, such as he afterwards never possessed, or never exerted. It is of a mode so distinct and peculiar, that it must be considered by itself; what is true of that, is not true of any thing else which he has written.
Page 142 - Then he instructed a young nobleman, that the best poet in England was Mr. Pope, (a Papist,) who had begun a translation of Homer into English verse, for which 'he must have them all subscribe; for,' says he, 'the author shall not begin to print till I have a thousand guineas for him.
Page 261 - Oh, how have you forgot me ! You endeavour by severities to force me from you, nor can I blame you ; for, with the utmost distress and confusion, I behold myself the cause of uneasy reflections to you, yet I cannot comfort you, but here declare, that...

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