The geography and history of Tournay

Front Cover
Moncur, 1709 - 44 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 7 - ... in 1732, when she left it, with an estate of about 20001. per annum, to her two servants, from whom the Manor was purchased by Coulson Fellows, Esq. in 1736'. or 1737. His grandson, William Henry Fellows, Esq. Member of Parliament for this county, is the present owner and resident. The Abbey stood at the upper end of the town, towards the south, at a little distance from the present Church. The only re^ main of importance is the ruined Gateway, a very fine fragment of beautiful architecture,...
Page 4 - ... inclose it with a wall and a ditch, and took care to have it perfected in his own life-time; so as to take in with it the old town of the Nervii, on both sides the river, but still to leave out their castle and tower, at the distance of five-hundred paces, down towards the north. He also built bridges over the river, to join the two parts of the town together; the part on the west side, upon the hill, being always the greater, that on the east side in the plain, the lesser. In fine, it was in...
Page 8 - Aurelian wall about Rome; but the gates, though twice as thick as the wall, yet are no higher, according to the common practice. The wall is terminated with a corridor, or gallery, running along the top of it ; the gates and towers with platforms, or...
Page 30 - ... countermined before-hand; on the other side, being a plain, the works are not liable to such an inconveniency, and, consequently, there is no need of such a remedy. So that, if ever an enemy comes about Tournay, and attacks it on the high side of the town, where the citadel and three of the horn-works are, they dare do it only by mining; and, the ground there being before-hand countermined, if they be not both very wary and very lucky, they may meet with dreadful rencounters. And, whereas, on...
Page 4 - ... all around, between the tower, which defended it at top, and the hedge which inclosed. it at the bottom, as it was before. And they changed the name of Alberon's camp-post, and called it by that of Bergen, signifying, in Teutonick, or old high Dutch, the ancient language of that country, as much, as if one would say, by way of distinction, The Hill: which name they designedly gave it, both because it was built upon a little hill, the only hill in the country thereabouts, and because of the respect...
Page 37 - ... of the other, which are there levelled, to make way for them ; so that they not only take up all the ground between the rampart of the citadel and that of the town, but also enter a pretty .way within the town, there being a grand overture made in the Emperor Charles the Fifth's rampart, to let them in. The two extremities of this rampart of the town are made to end sloping, in a right line upon the glacis of the citadel : And, in the space, within the town, between this glacis of the citadel,...
Page 38 - ... of the town toward the south, and the ditch without it is a moat, or wet ditch, supplied with water from the river, and continuing to be so, as far as the plain continues, that is, to the very angular point ; the other side, towards the citadel, stands high, upon the ascent of the hill ; that к 4 from the angular point begins to run up pretty steep, and the ditch without it is dry.
Page 33 - The length of each courtine is four hundred and eighty feet, and the circumference of each bastion eight hundred and ninety, in this manner: Each demigorge a hundred and fifteen feet, each flank ninety, and each face two hundred and forty ; which, doubled (there being two of each) and added together, make the circumference so much, as I have said: And the length of the courtines, multiplied by five(there being so many of them) with the circumference of the bastions (subtracting the dem...
Page 7 - ... this day, it does actually serve as a bridge: And, corresponding to it, there is another bridge of five arches over the river, at the lower end of the town, towards the north, at a place where the channel of it is so wide, as not 'to admit of a gate, or bridge of one arch upon it; which bridge joins the wall on the one side, and that on the other side together, at the other end of the town, and so compleats the inclosure.
Page 14 - ... by this time, were come to increase so much in number, by reason of a great concourse of people that had come thronging thither, at different times, on several occasions, and from a great many foreign countries, especially from France and Burgundy, that there was not room enough for them to lodge in, within the old town; and, no empty space being left to build any more in within King Chilperick's wall, they were obliged to build without the ditch : Which buildings, by degrees, grew out into suburbs,...

Bibliographic information