War Under Heaven: Pontiac, the Indian Nations, & the British Empire

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Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002 - History - 360 pages
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The 1763 Treaty of Paris ceded much of the continent east of the Mississippi to Great Britain, a claim which the Indian nations of the Great Lakes, who suddenly found themselves under British rule, considered outrageous. Unlike the French, with whom Great Lakes Indians had formed an alliance of convenience, the British entered the upper Great Lakes in a spirit of conquest. British officers on the frontier keenly felt the need to assert their assumed superiority over both Native Americans and European settlers. At the same time, Indian leaders expected appropriate tokens of British regard, gifts the British refused to give. It is this issue of respect that, according to Gregory Dowd, lies at the root of the war the Ottawa chief Pontiac and his alliance of Great Lakes Indians waged on the British Empire between 1763 and 1767.

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
CHAPTER
22
Ottawas Delawares and the Colonial World 16151760
31
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Gregory Evans Dowd is a professor of history and American Culture and the director of Native American Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He is the author of A Spirited Resistance: The North American Indian Struggle for Unity, 1745--1815, also available from Johns Hopkins.

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