Travels in Sweden, during the autumn of 1812

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1813
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Page 114 - Bonaparte ; because some commentator had shown that the letters in the name Napoleon Buonaparte make out the number 666, which is the mark of the beast. In consequence of this discovery, he ordered the name of the French emperor in all the Swedish newspapers to be always printed N. Buonaparte, and as the real reason of this whimsical charge was concealed by his ministers, it excited considerable curiosity in the country, and nobody was able to explain it in a satisfactory manner. He easily persuaded...
Page 358 - Her eyebrows black. Her pitchy-coloured hair hung loose about her head, and on it she wore a flat red cap. She had a grey petticoat; and from her neck, which resembled the skin of a frog, were suspended a pair of large loose breasts of the same brown complexion, but encompassed, by way of ornament, with brass rings.
Page 357 - Lapland fair-one excited. It might well be imagined that she was truly of Stygian origin. Her stature was very diminutive. Her face of the darkest brown from the effects of smoke. Her eyes dark and sparkling. Her eyebrows black. Her pitchy-coloured hair hung loose about her head, and on it she wore a flat red cap.
Page 358 - O thou poor man! what hard destiny can have brought thee hither, to a place never visited by any one before? This is the first time I ever beheld a stranger. Thou miserable creature! how didst thou come, and whither wilt thou go? Dost thou not perceive what houses and habitations we have, and with how much difficulty we go to church?
Page 132 - They are going to murder me, help ! help ! ' — They endeavoured to reassure the King ; and he promised to be more composed, if they would return his sword...
Page 135 - ... kingdom, indispensable to the happiness of a free and independent people. As we can now no longer exercise the Royal functions, according to the purity of our intentions, nor preserve peace and order in the kingdom, in a manner worthy of ourselves and our subjects, we consider it a holy duty to resign our kingly calling, which we now do freely and without compulsion, in order that we may be enabled to live the remainder of our days to the honour of God, wishing to all our subjects the grace and...
Page 7 - Swedish style, and possessed a degree of splendour at which I was not a little surprised. As the mode of dining in Sweden is very different from the mode followed in Great Britain, I shall give a general description of a dinner, that my readers may form some notion to themselves of the customs of that country. The houses in Sweden are fitted up with great magnificence. The public rooms are usually on the first floor, and vary from three to seven or more according to the size of the house and the...
Page 132 - The citizens mounted guard at the bank and public offices, and the streets werr kept quiet by patroles of the burgher cavalry and cuirassiers, who had orders not to molest any person who was not openly riotous. ' Mean while the King had entreated to be spared the mortification of seeing the officers who had been concerned in his arrest, and who had been left with him by Baron Adlercreutz in order to secure his person.
Page 230 - Like all the Swedish towns, it has an open square, from which the streets run, with the utmost regularity, in different directions. The church stands at the west end, at some little distance from the town ; and there is a small lake upon the north side, round which the road winds. The houses at the south-east end of the town are very mean. The streets are in general wide, but very ill paved.
Page 114 - No preparations on his part would be requisite to enable him to fulfil the intention of heaven. When besieged in Stralsund by a French army, he expected the visible interposition of an angel in his behalf. But when this angel, who was to be four German miles in height, did not appear, and the French batteries were nearly completed, he thought it requisite to attend to his own safety, and retreat to the island of Rugen.

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