The Condor's Shadow: The Loss and Recovery of Wildlife in America

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W.H. Freeman and Company, Jan 1, 1999 - Nature - 339 pages
3 Reviews
The heir apparent to Peter Matthiessen's 1959 classic Wildlife in America, The Condor's Shadow is a brilliant and compulsively readable study of the state of North American wildlife and what is being done to reverse the damage humans have caused. With equal respect for the smallest feather-mite and the fiercest grizzly, the frailest flower and the statelist redwood, David S. Wilcove illustrates -- in jargon-free, often witty prose -- nature's delicate system of checks and balances, examining the factors that determine a species' vulnerability and the consequences of losing even the tiniest part of any ecosystem. An examination of both the hearth-wrenching failures and stunning successes of our conservation efforts, The Condor's Shadow chronicles the destruction and resilience of our American wilderness and offers and insightful, eloquent overview that will appeal to avid conservationists and recreational nature-lovers alike.

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Review: The Condor's Shadow: The Loss And Recovery Of Wildlife In America

User Review  - Jason - Goodreads

Good book on the nature of species endangerment and extinction; if you're pretty involved/interested in it already, you probably won't learn a lot of new information, but it would be a good introductory book for anyone else. Read full review

Review: The Condor's Shadow: The Loss And Recovery Of Wildlife In America

User Review  - Suzanne - Goodreads

Interesting, but a little dry and repetitious - like a newspaper article that goes on too long. Probably most interesting for bird-watchers. Not a whole lot of reference to other wildlife. Read full review

About the author (1999)

David S. Wilcove is the author of "The Condor7;s Shadow: The Loss and Recovery of Wildlife in America" (Freeman, 1999), and numerous scientific and popular articles on wildlife conservation. One of the world7;s leading experts on endangered species, he is professor of ecology, evolutionary biology, and public affairs at Princeton University.

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