The Annals of America: From the Discovery by Columbus in the Year 1492, to the Year 1826, Volume 1

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Hilliard and Brown, 1829 - America
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Page 164 - Name of the Council Established at Plymouth in the County of Devon, for the Planting, Ruling, Ordering and Governing of New England in America...
Page 574 - ... a custom loathsome to the eye, hateful to the nose, harmful to the brain, dangerous to the lungs, and in the black stinking fume thereof, nearest resembling the horrible Stygian smoke of the pit that is bottomless.
Page 251 - ... we the Inhabitants and Residents of Windsor, Hartford and Wethersfield are now cohabiting and dwelling in and upon the River of Connecticut and the lands thereunto adjoining; and well knowing where a people are gathered together the word of God requires that to maintain the peace and union of such a people there should be an orderly and decent Government established according to God...
Page 480 - I give these books for the founding of a college in this colony...
Page 443 - Virginia, have had it in their minds, and have proposed to themselves, to the end that the Church of Virginia may be furnished with a seminary of ministers of the gospel, and that the youth may be piously educated in good letters and manners, and that the Christian faith may be propagated among the Western Indians, to the glory of Almighty God...
Page 394 - the Acts of Navigation were an invasion of the rights and privileges of the subjects of his majesty in the colony, they not being represented in parliament.
Page 438 - There was not a village in England that had not a ghost in it; the churchyards were all haunted; every large common had a circle of fairies belonging to it; and there was scarce a shepherd to be met with who had not seen a spirit.
Page 255 - a printing house was begun at Cambridge, by one Daye, at the charge of Mr. Glover, who died on sea hitherward. The first thing which was printed was the Freeman's Oath ; the next was an Almanack made for New England by Mr. William Pierce, mariner ; the next was the Psalms newly turned into...
Page 403 - LAWS of this government, to the great end of all government, viz: to support power in reverence with the people, and to secure the people from the abuse of power; that they may be free by their just obedience, and the magistrates honourable for their just administration: for liberty without obedience is confusion, and obedience without liberty is slavery.

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