The Nature of the Chemical Bond and the Structure of Molecules and Crystals: An Introduction to Modern Structural Chemistry

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Cornell University Press, 1960 - Science - 644 pages

The Nature of the Chemical Bond provides a general treatment, essentially nonmathematical, of present (as of 1960) knowledge about the structure of molecules and crystals and the nature of the chemical bond.

Among the new features in the third edition are a detailed resonating-valence-bond theory of electron-deficient substances, such as the boranes and ferrocene; a chemical theory of the electronic structure of metals and intermetallic compounds; a discussion of the role of the hydrogen bond in the structures of proteins and nucleic acids; the electroneutrality principle; and other new principles of molecular structure.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - aevaughn - LibraryThing

This was an excellent back when it was printed, and Linus Pauling actually won a Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the sorts of things discussed within this book. However, most of the material this book ... Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This book is one of the Masterpiece in Chemistry.
You simply can not rate this book in stars values. It is one of the EPIC in Chemistry.
I should say it is a bible or Bhagavad-Gita for chemists,

Contents

Prefaces
3
CHAPTER
7
The Hydrogen Molecule and the ElectronPair Bond
23
14
32
15
40
19
50
CHAPTER 3
65
CHAPTER 4
108
CHAPTER 8
265
The OneElectron Bond and the ThreeElectron Bond
340
A ResonatingBond Treatment of Ferrocene
386
CHAPTER 11
393
CHAPTER 12
449
CHAPTER 13
505
CHAPTER 14
563
Values of Physical Constants
573

CHAPTER 5
145
CHAPTER 6
185
CHAPTER 2
189
31
196
Molecules
209
Molecular Spectroscopy
594
The Boltzmann Distribution Law
602
The Strengths of the Hydrohalogenic Acids
618
Copyright

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About the author (1960)

Linus Pauling was Professor of Chemistry at the California Institute of Technology, and a recipient of both the Nobel Peace Prize and the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

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