A history of American manufactures from 1608 to 1860..: comprising annals of the industry of the United States in machinery, manufactures and useful arts, with a notice of the important inventions, tariffs, and the results of each decennial census

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E. Young, 1861 - Business & Economics
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Page 162 - I thank God, there are no free schools nor printing, and I hope we shall not have these hundred years. For learning has brought disobedience and heresy, and sects into the world, and printing has divulged them, and libels against the best government. God keep us from both"!
Page 19 - As for servants, if they had any sheet above them it was well : For seldom had they any under their bodies to keep them from the pricking straws that ran oft through the canvass, and rased their hardened hides.
Page 610 - State, with the fishing of all sorts of fish, whales, sturgeons, and all other royal fishes in the seas, bays, inlets and rivers within the premises ; and the fish therein taken, together with the royalty of the sea upon the...
Page 149 - For some time past, the old world has been fed from the new. The scarcity which you have felt would have been a desolating famine, if this child of your old age, with a true filial piety, with a Roman charity, had not put the full breast of its youthful exuberance to the mouth of its exhausted parent.
Page 166 - None of these was published oftener than twice a week. None exceeded in size a single small leaf. The quantity of matter which one of them contained in a year was not more than is often found in two numbers of the Times.
Page 409 - Pennsylvania Society for the Encouragement of Manufactures and the Useful Arts...
Page 82 - ... or a barrel of corn to any place in Europe out of the king's dominions. If this were for his majesty's service or the good of his subjects, we should not repine, whatever our sufferings are for it; but on my soul, it is the contrary for both.
Page 245 - For," as the Forefathers sang, we can make liquor to sweeten our lips Of pumpkins and parsnips and walnut-tree chips. Finally, as for salt, that grossest of groceries, to obtain this might be a fit occasion for a visit to the seashore, or, if I did without it altogether, I should probably drink the less water. I do not learn that the Indians ever troubled themselves to go after it.
Page 183 - It was carried through the press as privately as possible, and had the London imprint of the copy from which it was reprinted, viz : " London : Printed by Mark Baskett, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty...
Page 216 - No chapter in the history of national manners would illustrate so well, if duly executed, the progress of social life, as that dedicated to domestic architecture. The fashions of dress and of amusements are generally capricious and irreducible to rule ; but every change in the dwellings of mankind, from the rudest wooden cabin to the stately mansion, has been dictated by some principle of convenience, neatness, comfort or magnificence.

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