Narrative of the Texan Santa Fé Expedition: Comprising a Tour Through Texas, and Capture of the Texans

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Sherwood, Gilbert, and Piper - Indians of North America - 599 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
15
III
28
IV
40
V
56
VI
68
VII
83
VIII
101
XXI
332
XXII
347
XXIII
364
XXIV
378
XXV
391
XXVI
407
XXVII
421
XXVIII
435

IX
123
X
139
XI
155
XII
173
XIII
196
XIV
213
XV
230
XVI
246
XVII
266
XVIII
285
XIX
300
XX
317
XXIX
449
XXX
466
XXXI
480
XXXII
495
XXXIII
511
XXXIV
526
XXXV
539
XXXVI
553
XXXVII
565
XXXVIII
578
XXXIX
590

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Page 554 - ... there is as much difference between the two as there is between the religion of the Pilgrims of New-England and that of the Hindoos or New Zealanders.
Page 135 - ... as though he was the president, mayor, or chief — at all events, he was the ' big dog
Page 326 - They pertinaciously cling to the customs of their forefathers, and are becoming every year more and more impoverished — in short, they are morally, physically, and intellectually distanced in the great race of improvement which is run in almost every other quarter of the earth. Give them but tortillas, frijoles, and chile Colorado to supply their animal wants for the day, and seven tenths of the Mexicans are satisfied ; and so they will continue to be until the race becomes extinct or amalgamated...
Page 1 - Fe pioneers were but a company of marauders, sent to burn, slay and destroy in a foreign and hostile country, is so absurd as not to require contradiction; the attempt to conquer a province, numbering some one hundred and fifty thousand inhabitants within its borders, was a shade too Quixotical to find favour in the eyes of the three hundred and twenty odd pioneers who left Texas, encumbered with wagons, merchandise, and the implements of their different trades and callings.
Page 300 - Salazar (the commanding officer) ordered a soldier to shoot him. The first ball only wounded the wretched man, but the second killed him instantly, and he fell with his shirt still about his face. Golpin was a citizen of the United States, and reached Texas a short time before the expedition.
Page 142 - On starting in the morning, nothing was to be seen but a rough and rugged succession of hills before us — piled one upon another, each succeeding hill rising above its neighbour. At the summit of the highest of these hills the beautiful and fertile plain opened suddenly to view, giving scope to our vision and our hopes that was unanticipated and thrice welcome. The country between the Cross Timbers and the Rocky Mountains rises by high steppes, for the different lines of hills can be called by...
Page 135 - I might watch their movements. Directly in the centre of one of them, I particularly noticed a very large dog, sitting in front of...
Page 153 - This we followed, and soon found ourselves on the summit of the ridge. There we were again gratified at finding spread out before us a perfectly level prairie, extending as far as the eye could reach, without a tree to break the monotony of the scene. We halted a few minutes to rest our horses, and for some time watched what was passing in the valley we had left, now lying a thousand feet below us. All we could perceive at the distance which we were, was that all was in motion, and we thought that...
Page 276 - The men have a great feast, prepared for three successive days, which time is spent in eating, drinking, and dancing. Near this scene of amusement is a dismal gloomy cave, into which not a glimpse of light can penetrate, and where places of repose are provided for the revellers. To this cave, after dark, repair grown persons of every age and sex, who pass the night in indulgences of the most gross and sensual description.
Page 556 - ... the soft music of a hymn from some neighbouring convent. The whiterobed monk — the veiled female — even the ragged beggar, add to the picture: by daylight his rags are too visible. Frequently, as the carriages roll along to the opera, or as, at a late hour, they return from it, they are suddenly stopped by the appearance of the mysterious coach, with its piebald mules, and the Eye surrounded by rays of light on its panels ; a...

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