Nicolo Paganini: His Life and Work

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"The Strad" office, 1907 - Violinists - 205 pages
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Page 142 - Grecian lyres ; and on his sphery hand, Loading the air with dumb expectancy, Suspended, ere it fell, a nation's breath. He smote — and clinging to the serious chords With godlike ravishment, drew forth a breath, So deep, so strong, so fervid thick with love, Blissful, yet laden as with twenty prayers, That Juno yearned with no diviner soul To the first burthen of the lips of Jove. The exceeding mystery of the loveliness...
Page 209 - ADOLF BRODSKY writes—" I am delighted with the book and find it very instructive, even for those who think to know everything about the bow. It is very original and at times very amusing. No violinist should miss the opportunity to buy it." THE TIMES—" A useful treatise on the Bow, in which the history, manufacture and use of the bow are discussed with considerable technical knowledge.
Page 207 - I have read the book on Violin Playing you have sent me, and have to congratulate you sincerely on the manner in which you have performed a most difficult task, ie, to describe the best way of arriving at a correct manner of playing the violin. It cannot but be welcome to thoughtful teachers, who reflect on the method of our art, and I hope that your work will prove useful to many students. Believe me, my dear Mr. Courvoisier, to be most faithfully yours, JOSEPH JOACHIM. Berlin, November 3rd, 1894....
Page 209 - Crown 8uo. , Cloth 2/6, Post Free 2/9. THE BOW Its History, Manufacture and Use BY HENRY SAINT-GEORGE. With Full Page Illustrations (exact size) by Photo Process. MONS. EMILE SAURET writes—" I have read it with great interest, and think that it supplies a real want in giving musicians such an excellent description of all matters referring to this important instrument.
Page 44 - ... even brighter at the tones of the violin, and the chorale which resounded from their lips, and which I had taken for the song of the spheres, was only the dying echo of those violin tones. A holy, ineffable ardor dwelt in those sounds, which often trembled scarce audibly, in mysterious whisper on the water, then swelled out again with a shuddering sweetness, like a bugle's notes heard by moonlight, and then finally poured forth in unrestrained jubilee, as if a thousand bards had struck their...
Page 46 - Italian violinist, were come, in the hope of hearing some of his notes, and requested that the windows should be opened, in order that they also might enjoy his talent. The Queen went beyond their wishes, and, with truly royal...
Page 43 - James to bear and claim it as my own — much as I would like to. Says Heinrich Heine: I believe that only one man has succeeded in putting Paganini's true physiognomy upon paper — a deaf painter, Lyser by name, who in a frenzy full of genius has with a few strokes of chalk so well hit the great violinist's head that one is at the same time amused and terrified at the truth of the drawing. "The devil guided my hand...
Page 122 - ... him often, mostly by pointing with his bony hand to the piano without speaking, and I could only guess from his repeating the ceremony that he did not dislike it, for never a word of encouragement fell from his lips. How I longed to hear him play it is impossible to describe, perhaps even to imagine. From my earliest childhood I had heard of Paganini and his art as of something supernatural, and there I actually sat opposite to the man himself, but only looking at the hands that had created such...
Page 93 - A violin player, whose name ended in i, had been engaged in a murder and imprisoned — it could be only Paganini — the assassinated party was converted into either my rival or my mistress, and it was I, Paganini, who had been so many years loaded with chains, and immured in a dungeon. Solely with the view of wringing from me the secret of my new system, have they complimented me with fetters, whose only effect would have been to paralyze my arms.

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