Pioneer Women of the West

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C. Scribner, 1852 - Frontier and pioneer life - 434 pages
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Contents

I
13
II
29
III
42
IV
63
V
79
VI
110
VII
145
VIII
153
XIV
245
XV
254
XVI
274
XVII
281
XVIII
305
XIX
338
XX
350
XXI
361

IX
162
X
171
XI
199
XII
215
XIII
226
XXII
376
XXIII
388
XXIV
403
XXV
428
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Page 176 - Now therefore, if ye will obey my voice indeed, and keep my covenant, then ye shall be a peculiar treasure unto me above all people : for all the earth is mine. And ye shall be unto me a kingdom of priests, and an holy nation.
Page 139 - ... across the way. Sometimes an ambuscade was formed by the way-side, and an unexpected discharge of several guns took place, so as to cover the wedding company with smoke. ." Let the reader imagine the scene which followed this discharge: the sudden...
Page 301 - Caldwell* for it was he, entered the parlor with a calm step, and without a trace of agitation in his manner. He deliberately took off his accoutrements and placed them with his rifle behind the door, then saluted the hostile savages. "How now, my friends! A good-day to you.
Page 137 - These last were very cold and uncomfortable in wet weather. The shirt and jacket were of the common fashion. A pair of drawers or breeches and leggins, were the dress of the thighs and legs, a pair of moccasins answered for the feet much better than shoes. These were made of dressed deer skin.
Page 293 - I come to deliver up to you the medal I wear. It was given me by the Americans, and I have long worn it in token of our mutual friendship. But our young men are resolved to imbrue their hands in the blood of the whites. I cannot restrain them, and I will not wear a token of peace while I am compelled to act as an enemy.
Page 194 - Having arrived at Upper Sandusky, they built small huts of logs and bark to screen them from the cold, having neither beds nor blankets, and being reduced to the greatest poverty and want; for the savages had by degrees stolen almost every thing, both from the missionaries and Indians, on the journey.
Page 136 - The blockhouses were built at the angles of the fort. They projected about two feet beyond the outer walls of the cabins and stockades. Their upper stories were about eighteen inches every way larger in...
Page 343 - Of thickest covert was inwoven shade, Laurel and myrtle, and what higher grew Of firm and fragrant leaf; on either side Acanthus and each odorous bushy shrub Fenced up the verdant wall, each beauteous flower, Iris all hues, roses, and jessamine Reared high their flourished heads between, and wrought Mosaic; under foot the violet, Crocus, and hyacinth with rich inlay Broidered the ground, more coloured than with stone Of costliest emblem : other creature here, Beast, bird, insect, or worm, durst enter...
Page 142 - ... reach of the rifle.' The bleating of the fawn brought its dam to her death in the same way. The hunter often collected a company of mopish owls to the trees about his camp, and amused himself with their hoarse screaming ; his howl would raise and obtain responses from a pack of wolves, so as to inform him of their neighborhood, as well as guard him against their depredations.
Page 301 - let them put an end to my misery at once." Mrs. Bisson replied, " Your death would be the destruction of us all, for Black Partridge has resolved that if one drop of the blood of your family is spilled, he will take the lives of all concerned in it, even his nearest friends; and if once the work of murder commences, there will be no end of it, so long as there remains one white person or half-breed in the country.

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