The Booker T. Washington Papers: 1895-98

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University of Illinois Press, Jan 1, 1975 - Social Science - 593 pages
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The memoirs and accounts of the Black educator are presented with letters, speeches, personal documents, and other writings reflecting his life and career.
 

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Contents

11
11
Sept
12
Mar 1896 Two Extracted Versions of an Address
17
Sept
18
Sept
20
23
23
Sept
24
Nov 1896 George Washington Caner to the Tuskegee
27
Nov 1897 To Herbert Wrightington Carr
336
15
341
Nov 1897 From Robert Curtis Ogden
342
Dec 1897 A News Item in the Atlanta Journal
349
Dec 1897 From Ollie Meadows
357
Magazine
374
Feb 1898 From Daniel Webster Bythewood
384
Mar 1898 From Josephine Beall Wilson Bruce
391

Sept
33
Sept
45
From Thomas A Harris
51
May 1897
54
An Article in the New York World
60
From Laura Evangeline Mabry
64
From Irvine Garland Penn
70
4
71
5
80
To Warren Logan
83
From John Wesley Gilbert
85
Dec 1895 From Daniel Cranford Smith
96
Jan 1896 Viola Knapp Ruffner to Margaret James
103
Feb 1896 From Thomas Jefferson Morgan
117
Feb 1896 To Charles Gordon Ames
123
Mar 1896 From James Nathan Calloway
129
Mar 1896 From Henry Clay Reynolds
136
Mar 1896 From Jabez Lamar Monroe Curry
140
Mar 1896 From Andrew F Hilyer
149
From Ellen Collins
152
June 1896 From Martha H Willis
181
July 1896 From Portia Marshall Washington
203
4
208
Sept 1896 From Albert G Davis
209
7
230
Nov 1896 From Daniel Augustus Straker
235
Nov 1896 From Samuel McCune Lindsay
240
From Edward Wihnot Blyden
241
Mar 1897 From Alonzo Homer Kenniebrew
265
Aug 1897 From Albert Bushnell Hart
320
Sept 1897 From William Hannibal Thomas
328
Mar 1898 From William Jenkins
397
Apr 1898 A Draft of an Address at Hampton Institute
406
Apr 1898 From James B Stone
413
May 1898 From John Henry Washington
419
18
433
June 1898 To George Washington Carver
435
From Emily Howland
451
19
465
20
471
From William Edward Burghardt Du Bois
474
From Thomas Austin
501
From Victoria Earle Matthews
512
21
516
From Timothy Thomas Fortune
523
Dec 1898 From William A Pledger
530
Dec 1898 A Sunday Evening Talk
536
Dec 1898 From J M Holland
542
24
546
Dec 1898 From Timothy Thomas Fortune
549
ADDENDUM
555
47
558
INDEX
561
26
563
51
567
60
580
519
582
64
587
34
590
88
593
Copyright

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About the author (1975)

Booker Taliaferro Washington, 1856 - 1915 Booker T. Washington was born a slave in Hales Ford, Virginia, near Roanoke. After the U.S. government freed all slaves in 1865, his family moved to Malden, West Virginia. There, Washington worked in coal mines and salt furnaces. He went on to attend the Hampton, Virginia Normal and Agricultural Institute from 1872-1875 before joining the staff in 1879. In 1881 he was selected to head the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, a new teacher-training school for blacks, which he transformed into a thriving institution, later named Tuskegee University. His controversial conviction that blacks could best gain equality in the U.S. by improving their economic situation through education rather than by demanding equal rights was termed the Atlanta Compromise, because Washington accepted inequality and segregation for blacks in exchange for economic advancement. Washington advised two Presidents, Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft, on racial problems and policies, as well as influencing the appointment of several blacks to federal offices. Washington became a shrewd political leader and advised not only Presidents, but also members of Congress and governors. He urged wealthy people to contribute to various black organizations. He also owned or financially supported many black newspapers. In 1900, Washington founded the National Negro Business League to help black business firms. Washington fought silently for equal rights, but was eventually usurped by those who ideas were more radical and demanded more action. Washington was replaced by W. E. B. Du Bois as the foremost black leader of the time, after having spent long years listening to Du Bois deride him for his placation of the white man and the plight of the negro. He died in 1915.

Smock, former historian of the U.S. House of Representatives.

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