Makers of American History: Daniel Boone

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University Society, Incorporated, 1904 - Governors - 176 pages
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Contents

I
3
II
21
III
41
IV
61
V
83
VI
100
VII
113
VIII
126
XIII
35
XIV
44
XV
58
XVI
69
XVII
78
XVIII
90
XIX
104
XX
119

IX
136
X
149
XI
11
XII
23

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Page 30 - his family. In his story, as told by Filson, he says, " We arrived safe, without any other difficulty than such as are common to this passage, my wife and daughters being the first white women that ever stood on the banks of Kentucky River." Shortly after the arrival of Mrs.
Page 64 - mean; and therefore I will freely grant him a discharge for whatever sums of mine he might have been possessed of at that time." * Boone says, according to Filson, " The history of my going home, and returning with my family, forms a series of difficulties, an account of which would swell a volume, but
Page 94 - The inhabitants of this county are very much alarmed at the thought of the Indians bringing another campaign into our country this fall. If this should be the case, it will break up these settlements. I hope, therefore, your Excellency will take the matter into your consideration, and send us some relief as quickly as possible.
Page 102 - weed himself,) the amount, perhaps, of one hundred and fifty hills. As a shelter for curing it, he had built an enclosure of rails, a dozen feet in height, and covered it with cane and grass. Stalks of tobacco are usually split and strung on sticks about four feet in length. The ends of these
Page 44 - their camp-fires, with the loaded rifle at hand, rehearsing, for the twentieth time, the tale of noble daring, or the hair-breadth escape, Boone would sit silent, apparently not heeding the conversation, employed in repairing the rents in his hunting shirt and leggings, moulding bullets, or cleaning his rifle. Yet the eyes of the garrison were
Page 10 - or drawers, of the same material, covered the lower extremities, to which was appended a pair of moccasins for the feet. The cape or collar of the hunting shirt, and the seams of the leggings, were adorned with fringes. The under garments were of coarse cotton. A
Page 163 - The painted monsters," says Stoddard, * on the side of a high perpendicular rock, apparently inaccessible to man, between the Missouri and Illinois, and known to the moderns by the name of Piesa, still remain in a good degree of preservation."—
Page 95 - with showing all due hospitality and civilities to the ambassadors, but signified his intention to return the compliment by a visit to their commander. Two hours before the time appointed for the visit, a master of ceremonies appeared with six men, who cleared the way over which the great chief was to pass, and
Page 174 - The narrative itself is written in a terse, simple, and unpretending style. The author relates what occurs, and describes what he sees, without embellishment or display. He writes as a scholar, and as a man of careful observation and practical sense. There is no tendency to
Page 82 - name of Simon Girty, in consequence of his striking resemblance to the man of that name; that if he had artillery or reinforcements, he might bring them up; but that if either he, or any of the naked rascals with him, found their way into the fort, they would disdain to use their guns against them, but would drive them out again with

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