Shakespeare's Tragedy of Coriolanus

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American book Company, 1909 - 341 pages
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Page 252 - I must have liberty Withal, as large a charter as the wind, To blow on whom I please...
Page 335 - I will ask him for my place again ; he shall tell me I am a drunkard ! Had I as many mouths as Hydra, such an answer would stop them all. To be now a sensible man, by and by a fool, and presently a beast! O strange! Every inordinate cup is unblessed and the ingredient is a devil.
Page 337 - Methought I heard a voice cry, Sleep no more ! Macbeth does murder sleep, the innocent sleep ; Sleep, that knits up the ravell'd sleave of care, The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast ;— Lady M.
Page 337 - Sleep no more! Macbeth does murder sleep" — the innocent sleep, Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleave of care; The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great Nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast — Lady M. What do you mean? Macb. Still it cried "Sleep no more!
Page 160 - I'll never Be such a gosling to obey instinct, but stand, As if a man were author of himself And knew no other kin.
Page 334 - Reputation, reputation, reputation ! O, I have lost my reputation ! I have lost the immortal part of myself, and what remains is bestiaL My reputation, lago, my reputation ! IAGO.
Page 32 - What would you have, you curs, That like nor peace nor war ? the one affrights you, The other makes you proud. He that trusts to you, Where he should find you lions, finds you hares ; Where foxes, geese : you are no surer, no, Than is the coal of fire upon the ice, Or hailstone in the sun.
Page 269 - Well, Dauphine, you have lurch'd your friends of the better half of the garland, by concealing this part of the plot: but much good do it thee, thou deserv'st it, lad.
Page 135 - I lov'd the maid I married; never man Sigh'd truer breath ; but that I see thee here, Thou noble thing ! more dances my rapt heart Than when I first my wedded mistress saw Bestride my threshold.
Page 10 - The language of poetry naturally falls in with the language of power.

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