Modernity in the Flesh: Medicine, Law, and Society in Turn-of-the-century Argentina

Front Cover
Stanford University Press, 2004 - Social Science - 244 pages
0 Reviews
This book examines the lives of people caught in the dynamics of changing mores, rapid urbanization, and real public health issues in nineteenth-century Buenos Aires. Modernity in the Flesh shows the costs Argentines paid for the establishment of liberal democracy between 1880 and 1910. Modernity raised consciousness of the public good and a commitment to new sciences and a new set of priorities that asserted the precedence of health and security of the social whole. This book shows the ways that the tensions of liberal democracy between individual rights and the social good were tempered by "flesh" and articulated through this word. As the state was pursuing positivist science and government, the flesh held out a type of corrective to the focus on scientific and material progress.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Liberalism and the Ego
23
Social Responsibility and Free Will
53
Social Poisons and Contagion
84
Modern Diseases in the National Identity
115
Eliminating Threats to the State
144
Passion in a State of Reason
172
Conclusion
201
Notes
205
Select Bibliography
225
Index
235
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page ix - Fellow, and has received grants from the National Science Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

About the author (2004)

Kristin Ruggiero is Associate Professor of History and Director of the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee.

Bibliographic information