Sharpe's London magazine, a journal of entertainment and instruction. [entitled] Sharpe's London journal. [entitled] Sharpe's London magazine, conducted by mrs. S.C. Hall

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Anna Maria Hall
1848
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Page 221 - Though I look old, yet I am strong and lusty: For in my youth I never did apply Hot and rebellious liquors in my blood; Nor did not with unbashful forehead woo The means of weakness and debility; Therefore my age is as a lusty winter, Frosty, but kindly: let me go with you; I'll do the service of a younger man In all your business and necessities.
Page 21 - My conscience hath a thousand several tongues, And every tongue brings in a several tale, And every tale condemns me for a villain.
Page 58 - In Endymion, I leaped headlong into the Sea, and thereby have become better acquainted with the Soundings, the quicksands, and the rocks, than if I had stayed upon the green shore, and piped a silly pipe, and took tea and comfortable advice. I was never afraid of failure; for I would sooner fail than not be among the greatest.
Page 118 - Look not upon me, because I am black, Because the sun hath looked upon me: My mother's children were angry with me ; They made me the keeper of the vineyards; But mine own vineyard have I not kept.
Page 67 - O my dove, that art in the clefts of the rock, in the secret places of the stairs, Let me see thy countenance, let me hear thy voice ; For sweet is thy voice, and thy countenance is comely.
Page 81 - Joy is the sweet voice, Joy the luminous cloud — We in ourselves rejoice! And thence flows all that charms or ear or sight, All melodies the echoes of that voice, All colours a suffusion from that light.
Page 20 - love," which greybeards call divine, Be resident in men like one another And not in me : I am myself alone.
Page 59 - O that I could be buried near where she lives! I am afraid to write to her — to receive a letter from her — to see her handwriting would break my heart — even to hear of her anyhow, to see her name written, would be more than I can bear.
Page 16 - Oh that my words were now written! Oh that they were printed in a book! That they were graven with an iron pen and lead In the rock for ever!
Page 59 - I believe tho' she has faults — the same as Charmian and Cleopatra might have had. Yet she is a fine thing speaking in a worldly way: for there are two distinct tempers of mind in which we judge of things — the worldly, theatrical and pantomimical ; and the unearthly, spiritual and ethereal — in the former Buonaparte, Lord Byron and this Charmian hold the first place in our Minds ; in the latter, John Howard, Bishop Hooker rocking his child's cradle, and you my dear Sister are the conquering...

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