I Hear a Symphony: Motown and Crossover R&B

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University of Michigan Press, May 30, 2017 - Music - 334 pages
I Hear a Symphony opens new territory in the study of Motown’s legacy, arguing that the music of Motown was indelibly shaped by the ideals of Detroit’s postwar black middle class; that Motown’s creative personnel participated in an African-American tradition of dialogism in rhythm and blues while developing the famous “Motown Sound.” Throughout the book, Flory focuses on the central importance of “crossover” to the Motown story; first as a key concept in the company’s efforts to reach across American commercial markets, then as a means to extend influence internationally, and finally as a way to expand the brand beyond strictly musical products. Flory’s work reveals the richness of the Motown sound, and equally rich and complex cultural influence Motown still exerts.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Searching for Motown
15
2 The Rise of the Motown Sound
41
3 Motown and Soul
69
4 Motown International
100
5 From Motown to the MoWest
135
6 The 1980s and Beyond
164
Appendixes
195
Notes
207
Bibliography
273
Index
323
Copyright

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About the author (2017)

Andrew Flory is an Assistant Professor of Music at Carleton College.

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