Music Theory in Seventeenth-century England

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Oxford University Press, 2000 - Music - 316 pages
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The fundamental changes that resulted in the development of the Baroque style around the turn of the seventeenth century also had a profound effect on music theory. As musicians began to adopt new approaches to composition, authors gradually became aware that the theories on which theyrelied, some of which dated back to medieval times, were largely obsolete. Thus, over the course of the seventeenth century, there occurred a complete transformation in almost every aspect of theory: by the 1720s, many of the principles being described bore close relation to those still used today. Nowhere was this metamorphosis clearer than in England where, because of a traditional emphasis on practicality, there was much more willingness to accept and encourage new theoretical ideas than on the continent. By tracing the progress of both rudimentary and more advanced compositional theoriesin English treatises, Dr Herissone provides a detailed and comprehensive commentary on musical developments during the period.
 

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Contents

Sources
12
Time
26
Pitch Structure
74
Harmony
113
Compositional Rules
142
Tonality
174
Texture and Form
194
Conclusion
224
Select Bibliography
297
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About the author (2000)

Rebecca Herissone is at Lancaster University.

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