Music Theory in Seventeenth-century England

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Oxford University Press, 2000 - Music - 316 pages
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'This welcome survey covers a great deal of ground... Clarity of organisation is only the most immediately obvious of the book's strengths. The author scrutinizes all her materials with a critical eye, and charts an astonishing number of disagreements, confusions and self-contradictions.' -Early Music'A full and invaluable account of English theoretical writing over the period... A particularly valuable contribution of the book to English music history is the four full appendices.' -Musical TimesThe fundamental changes that resulted in the development of the Baroque style around the turn of the seventeenth century also had a profound effect on music theory. Music Theory in Seventeenth-Century England explores these changes, concentrating specifically on English writings because of their emphasis on practical application and consequent ready rejection of the obsolete. This allows for a detailed and comprehensive commentary on how treatises reflect musical developments during the period.
 

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Contents

Sources
12
Time
26
Pitch Structure
74
Harmony
113
Compositional Rules
142
Tonality
174
Texture and Form
194
Conclusion
224
Select Bibliography
297
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About the author (2000)

Rebecca Herissone is at Lancaster University.

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