A Native Chieftaincy in Southwest China: Franchising a Tai Chieftaincy Under the Tusi System of Late Imperial China

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BRILL, 2005 - Social Science - 317 pages
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For nearly 700 years, the Chinese state exercised control over the minority peoples in its border provinces through the hereditary native chieftaincies (tusi). Utilizing fieldwork carried out by PRC authorities in the 1950s, this book investigates a Zhuang tusi in Guangxi. It explores the history and institutions of the tusi system, and discusses the dual quality of the tusi chieftaincy as a Chinese franchise and a non-Chinese polity. It describes the social structure, village administration and land tenure system of this tusi, the customary institutions of its ruling clan, and the impact of the replacement by direct Chinese rule in the 20th century. It also sheds light on the political management of the strategically sensitive Chinese-Vietnamese border over 600 years.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Chinese Territorial Administration Prior to the Native Chieftaincy System The Bridle and Halter Prefectures
24
Historical Origins and Geographical Boundaries of the Anping Native Chieftaincy
46
StateSanctioned Power The Anping Native Official as Agent of the Chinese Court
66
Local Political Power The Anping Native Official as Local Emperor
90
Civilizing Districts and Local Headmen The Administrative Organization of the Villages
123
Classes of People in the Anping Native Chieftaincy
149
The System of Land Tenure in the Anping Native Chieftaincy
184
Zhuang Areas in Diaocha
284
Record in Stone of Perpetual Regulations
285
Native Official Posts and Ranks during the Qing
287
Land Distributed by the Last Anping Native Official to the Official Clan
289
Case Study Xiali Manor Estate
291
Glossary
298
Western Bibliography
304
Chinese Bibliography
309

The Impact of Gaitu Guiliu on the Anping Native Chieftaincy
226
Review and Closing Remarks
258
Some Details recorded by the Fieldworkers on Local Zhuang Customs at Anping
273

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About the author (2005)

Jennifer Took, Ph.D. (2002) in Chinese Studies, The University of Melbourne, is a Lawyer and an Honorary Senior Fellow at the Melbourne Institute of Asian Languages and Societies, The University of Melbourne.

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